Different Types of Screw Threads & Terminology

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Different Types of Screw Threads and Terminology

From professional contractors to the DIYers at home, virtually every individual performing a construction, remodeling or decorating project will use screws and fasteners. These small tools come in many shapes and sizes, typically labeled using terminology that the average homeowner or novice repair servicer may not be familiar with.

At All Points Fasteners, we understand that learning and memorizing the different types of screw threads can be confusing. To help you identify the type and use of various screws, we’ve created this helpful screw thread terminology guide that you can quickly reference any time you need to select a specific screw and screw thread measurement.

What Are the Different Types of Threads on Screws?

If you’ve ever felt lost walking down the fastener aisle of the hardware store, you’re not alone. The types of screws you need for a woodworking project like building a table are different from the screw types and sizes you would use when building a deck. Refer to our list of the different types of screws to help you identify which is the right fastener for your job:

  • Woodworking: Woodworking screws are some of the most common types of screws. Used for connecting two or more wooden objects, woodworking screws feature a tapered shank with sharp threading to dig into the wood.
  • Drywall: Although they can be used for woodworking, drywall screws are designed for use on drywall projects. However, the wrong-sized drywall anchor screw could damage pure plaster walls. The drywall screw size, length and weight must match the type of wall or ceiling drywall being used. Drywall screws for metal studs or hardwood, when used in cabinet work, are fine thread and twinfast which features two threads. They typically have a sharp point and a black oxide finish. When drywall screws are used in wood studs or soft woods (in cabinetry), they feature coarse threads.
  • Machine: Machine screws are a common type of screw used in machining applications to connect two or more metal objects. They fit in with corresponding nuts or tapped holes that have the same diameter and number of threads.
  • Lag: Also known as coach screws, a lab screw is a type of screw that forms its own thread in pre-drilled holes and is usually used to fasten metal to wood.
  • Gutters and siding: Screws used for gutters and siding are designed to provide a stronger hold, typically coated with a weather-resistant material and available in finishes to match the gutter or siding color.
  • Security: Security screws are unique in that they do not have an operable head like other screws, which protects them from being removed or tampered with. To install or remove these screws, special tools are required.
  • Self-drilling: Self-drilling screws are available as “magnetic” and “non-magnetic” stainless steel varieties that are used for metal-to-metal and wood-to-metal applications. Roofing screws are an example of self-drilling screws.
  • Self-piercing: Self-piercing screws have powerful penetration capabilities because their threads are machined down to the end of the point. They can require fewer tools and help with faster installation.
  • Self-tapping: Self-tapping screws are threaded to create their own holes when installed. They form a matching thread in whatever material they are installed into. Self-tapping screws like sheet metal screws may be used in HVAC applications. Self-tapping deck screws are often coated with a corrosive-resistant material, such as ceramic.
  • Thread-forming: Used with plastic materials, thread-forming screws feature two separate threads: one high and one low. This makes the pullout strength higher while also ensuring plastic does not crack or otherwise break.
  • Type U: Type U screws have a unique spiral thread, and they are typically fastened into a plastic or metal casing material via a hammer instead of a screwdriver.

If you still have questions about which type of screw you need, our expert staff is ready to help you match the screw to the project.

What Is a Screw Thread?

The thread of a screw is the helical shape that runs around the cylinder of the screw. It converts rotational movement into linear movement and can include a variety of differences, like the shape of the thread, its angle and the size of the pitch — the space between the crests of each thread. Each of these subtle and small characteristics can make a significant difference in the performance of the screw and its applications.

Screw Thread Terminology

Knowing the different screw types and sizes is helpful, but to accurately select the right screw for your project, you’ll likely need to know a little about how screw threads work, as well. So, how do screw threads work? Like the screws themselves, screw threads are designed to meet the needs of specific applications.

types of screw threads

You can try to find a screw thread chart that outlines all of your different options, but what you really need is a guide to screw thread terminology that answers all your questions and provides a comprehensive rundown of different screw and bolt thread types and why they matter.

To help you make the best investments in fasteners for your next project, here’s a thorough guide to screw thread terminology:

  • External Threads: External threads (ie: male threads) mean the threads are on the bolts or screws. Threads are sometimes on the nuts rather than the bolts or screws.
  • Internal Threads: Internal threads (ie: female threads) mean the threads are on the nuts rather than the bolts or screws.
  • Machine Screw Threads: Machine screw threads are unique in that they are specially designed to mate with threads on nuts or threads present in tapped holes. Not self-tapping threads.
  • Spaced Threads: Spaced threads are designed to form their own threads in pre-drilled holes. You’ll most often find spaced threads on self-tapping, wood and coach screws.
  • Lag Screws: Lag screws are just one example of screws that form their own thread in pre-drilled holes. Typically, coach screws are used to fasten metal to wood.
  • Self-Tapping Screws: Self-tapping screws are threaded to create their own holes when installed. They form a matching thread in whatever material they are installed into. This makes using self-tapping screws incredibly efficient.
  • Thread-Forming Screws: Used with plastic materials, thread-forming screws feature two separate threads: one high and one low. This makes the pullout strength higher while also ensuring plastic does not crack or otherwise break.
  • Type U Screws: Type U screws include an unusual spiral thread that is most often driven with a hammer into materials like plastic and metal casings.
  • Wood Screws: Wood screws feature a tapered shank with sharp threading.

Additional Fastener Terminology

Here are a few additional terms related screws and threading that are helpful to know:

  • Major Diameter: This refers to the diameter of a screw including the raised helix’s height like an imaginary cylinder around the thread. It is measured using a slot gauge or a caliper rule. You can only measure major diameter with an external thread screw
  • Minor Diameter: Minor diameter is a screw’s diameter measured at the base or root of the thread at the innermost part of the screw. You need specialized equipment to measure the minor diameter accurately.
  • Effective Diameter: The effective diameter is essentially the average of the major and minor diameters. It is measured halfway up the raised helix, and, again, you need specialized equipment to get an accurate sense of a screw’s effective diameter.
  • Pitch: The pitch is the distance between two threads on the same screw.
  • Crest: The crest is the height of an external thread. Or, you can find the crest by subtracting minor diameter from major diameter. The crest is the difference between the two.
  • Thread angles: The thread angle is the actual angle of both flanks of a screw. Symmetrical threads indicate that both sides of the thread are angled to the same degree. It’s common for thread angles to be referred to as simply “the flank.”
  • Coarse and fine threads: The terms “coarse” and “fine” refer to the distance between the crest of each thread. Smaller gaps create fine threads and larger ones create coarse threads.

At All Points Fasteners, we offer an unmatched selection of different types of screw thread options, as well as different types of screw heads and other features. We often work with service contractors in the HVAC and gutter industries, as well as do-it-yourself enthusiasts who want to achieve professional-grade results with their projects. No matter why you need different types of screw threads, we want to offer access to the type of screw you’re looking for.

Why It’s Important to Get the Right Screw Thread

Not all screw threads are going to work with all applications. Each one is tailored to different tasks and different material sizes. Some will require pre-drilled holes while others have sharp designs meant for drilling directly into softer materials like wood. Other screws vary in thread spacing, which is important for various characteristics of the screw. If using any bolts or nuts, you’ll need to make sure they match the screw’s spacing.

By paying special attention to these characteristics, you can more readily ensure that your choice of screw provides appropriate strength and performance for the application.

Free High-Quality Fastener Samples From All Points Fasteners

Using our quick reference guide, you can effortlessly determine which screw thread is right for your application. If you’re still uncertain about which screw is right for you, we encourage you to request a free sample of our stocked items or reach out to us and talk with an expert. We’re ready to go above and beyond to help your source the exact fasteners you need for your project. Browse our site today to discover the best high-quality fasteners in the industry and visit our blog for more helpful advice Call All Points Fasteners today to speak with a knowledgeable staff member who will be happy to answer all your questions.

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How Does a Screw Work | Different Types & Uses

When you’re taking on a large project like building a deck or framing a new room, you’ll need an ample supply of screws and other fasteners. If you’re wondering about the different types of screws and when one will work more effectively than another, All Points Fasteners is here to help.

We offer multiple types of screws and have all the information needed to help you use them properly. We’re here to help you get your projects done right and done fast.

How Does a Screw Work?

The world of screws is vast, and you’ll find no shortage of different options when you shop for screws for your next project. How does a screw work?

A screw has the same overall shape as a nail, but it includes a spiraling groove travelling around and down the shaft. The head has several options, including hex, pan, flat and round.  Drives can be slotted or made with a Phillips head design for driving.

When you need to hold two materials or objects together, the groove helps keep the screw in place and the bond secure. To drive the screw into a material, you’ll need a screwdriver or drill that’s compatible with the head design.

There are many different types of screws, and while their exact uses differ, what a screw does best is hold two things together. What are different types of screws used for? Here’s a primer on the different types of screws available to you, as well as some key information as you evaluate what types of screws will work best to meet your needs.

What Is a Screw Used For?

Screws are fasteners for all sorts of construction projects, large and small. The reason there are so many different types of screws is that there are so many different ways objects and materials need to be fastened.

Sometimes screws are classified by the material they are used to fasten. For example, you might find you need concrete screws for fastening objects to concrete, wood screws for fastening objects to wood, or drywall screws for fastening objects to drywall. No one screw or fastening could possibly serve as a one-size-fits-all solution, because there are simply too many different needs and applications for screws and fasteners.

What Are the Different Types of Screws?

Because of how many different ways there are to use screws, you’ll find there are tons of different types of screws. Here are just a few of the different kinds you’ll find when searching for the right solution:

These are just a few of the different types of screws. You may find that the screw you need is classified into one of the categories above, but it’s also categorized by its drive type (Phillips, slotted, combination, star, etc.) or by the shape of its head (oval, flat, button, round, pan, etc.). In some cases, you may find a screw is classified by a combination of terms. For example, you might find that you need a slotted flathead metal screw.

What Is the Difference Between a Self-Tapping Screw and a Normal Screw?

With most screws, you’ll need to drill a pilot hole that creates threads and helps guide the screw into a secure spot. That’s not the case with self-tapping (or self-drilling) screws. When you choose self-tapping screws, there’s no need for a pilot hole. The screw creates its own threads as it is installed and remains tightly in place despite any activity or vibrations.

What’s the benefit of self-tapping screws?

Self-tapping screws save tons of time when you’re working on a significant project. For example, if you’re working to fasten objects and you need to use several dozen screws to get the job done, choosing self-tapping screws can significantly decrease the amount of time the project takes you. This is incredibly important in large construction projects where getting the project done on time is of the utmost importance.

These screws are also reliable, as they hold materials together firmly and have a long service life. Installing self-tapping screws with a coating can also prevent discoloration of the material due to rust or corrosion, making these fasteners ideal for harsh environments.

Get the Screws You Need at All Points Fasteners

At All Points Fasteners, we work each day with service contractors to ensure they have the screws they need to deliver outstanding results. We specialize in tracking down even the most difficult-to-find fastening solutions — so our clients always have access to exactly what they need.

You find nothing but products of the highest quality in our selection, as well as affordable pricing that helps your project stay under budget. We provide domestic quality at an imported price. If you can’t find the right part for your project, let us know and our experts will point you in the right direction. We’re committed to your satisfaction, so we’re always happy to work with you to find the products you need.

Browse our vast selection of screws online today or contact us to learn more.

Self-Tapping Deck Screws

Self-Tapping Deck Screws

Self-tapping screws are the least thought about component when people think of buildings, furniture, cars, bikes or just about anything else you can name. But really, when you think of it, you can’t throw a rock without hitting something put together with screws. Since the job of the screw is to keep things together, quality for this little thought of component is more important than people usually think.

Self-tapping screws are fantastic because of their design. When you begin turning a self-tapping screw, it displaces material around itself to cut its own threads. Since the screw creates the threads, it establishes them in a position that generates resistance to hold itself in place. The threads act like insulation, protecting the screw from loosening under waves of vibration and activity.

This screw also saves you time. It can take hours to drill holes, place traditional bolts and tighten them in place with a washer and nut. With self-tapping screws, you can get the job done much faster. Since these fasteners secure themselves and remain tightly in place, you can save yourself hours of work and enjoy the final product sooner.

One of the lesser-known but not long ago developed model of screws is the decking screw. These screws are meant for installing rails,build framing and fastening decking planks. These high quality self tapping deck screws are ceramic coated to keep the screw form bleeding and discoloring the wood.

Self-tapping wood screws , and other screws, really make a big difference in the outcomes of any house project. These basic products can be the difference between a finished project that can last for a lot of years and one which may fall apart the first time you use it. Everyone has made compromises when performing project work. This is typically due to the inconvenience of having to run to the store for the little and seemingly insignificant part that simply does not appear to be worth the effort to make the trip. If you consider arrogance in your venture, you may want to rethink if that is true. If it seriously did not make a difference you may not have the multitude of options to choose from. Wood screws come in dozens of lengths and have certain characteristics for particular uses.

One leading example of a specialty wood screw is for outside decking. Deck screws are specially coated to be rust-resistant. Doing so can help decrease the chance of unpleasant rust marks from developing on your outdoor patio stretch. The rust resistant covering additionally keeps the screw from becoming deteriorated by weather conditions. Because they are exposed to the outdoors, and in the case of the outdoor patio, are especially vulnerable to the elements. This is simply because the fasteners are employed on a flat surface that can pool water in the fastener holes. A failure can result should the fastener rust through. The resulting loose decking could additionally cause a safety hazard and homeowner liability. The enzymes and chemical substances employed in treated timber can be hard on the screw as well. The small expense in employing the right screws pales in comparability to the doable consequences. Recall, the covering is merely corrosion proof so to treat the outdoor patio face as needed to hold each the wood and fasteners in good shape.

Wood screws have come a long way in their overall performance and the know-how these folks employ. This technological innovation allows for greater, and lengthier long lasting benefits with your home projects. This translates into much better wanting tasks using an expert quality. One recent development in of a wood screw is the use of different drive heads. The most popular are still the Phillips head screws. The cross shaped drive head provides safe contact in between the driver and the screw. They also permit for a standard of connection offering the user the ability to do the job on different planes while taking care of control of the fastener. The sq disk will take doing so connection separating app and screw and creates a contact point which not only supply much better grip during the drive, but attaches so snugly that you can do the job upside straight down or sideways without losing contact using the drive head. The regular fastener head has its uses, but for comfort the sq drive and Phillips head offer added control.

The design of a wood screw is being founded on the particular characteristics of how wood works using the fastener. If you evaluate a metal screw to a wood screw you will see most differences. The wood screw is tapered producing the connection more safe. A metal screw does not possess this taper, and because of doing so, must not be employed in wood applications. The screw can have a propensity to again from the hole leading to the joint to fail. Wood screws usually do not possess threads that extend all the way to the screw head. This feature helps keep the fastener firmly in place. The best advice is if you do have a wood venture, use self-tapping wood screws for an ideal result.

Not only can be used in decks but also can be used in docks, fences, spas, Gazebos, siding and other outdoor applications. Now, if you are wondering as to how these fasteners can enhance the quality of your furniture in any way, here are the points that prove its superiority.

* Decking screws can last for a long time when they have special corrosive resisting coatings.

Very popular coatings are ceramic which offer 500 hours, 1000 hours and up to 1200 hours salt spray testing. This gives protection from rain and other types of elements which can cause rust in most other types of plated screws. The ceramic coating also prevents streaking or staining the lumber. They come colored coded for red, green and tan lumber.

They present a nice clean look to the surface since they are made with nibs built under the head so that they will countersink themselves and will be flush with the wood. They are specifically made with a lot of convenience to work with such as the Type 17 point which will allow the excess wood to escape and thus prevent the wood from splitting while the screw is being installed. After they are drilled in, there is no bulge on the exterior surface.

They normally come readily available in either phillips or square drive, square drive being the most well-liked because the square bits are the simplest to use as they help avert slipping.

The simple fact that they are self tapping screws they will also save you time and cash considering they will tap their own threads. As long as you have good building materials, your self-tapping deck screws will hold your structure together with ease.

Let All Points Fasteners Help You Build Reliable Decks and More

All Points Fasteners offers quality components for commercial and residential construction work. With our help, you and your team can complete projects fast while maintaining a reputation for high-quality work. When you partner with us, we ensure you receive excellent customer service, live representative chat and timely shipping.

All Points Fasteners is owned and operated in America, and we provide domestic quality at an imported price. To learn more, feel free to contact us online or call us at 800.483.6354.

Different Screw Head and Drive Types and What They Are Designed For

Different Screw Head and Drive Types and What They Are Designed For

When you picture a screw, you might imagine a Phillips head or a slotted screw. Those are two common screw drive types, but there are so many other different screw drives in the world — and each offers unique value and benefits.

If you want to know more about all the kinds of screws, All Points Fasteners will explain your options. Here’s a look at different types of screw heads for you to consider as you search for the perfect fastener head type to quickly and effectively complete your work.

What Are the Different Types of Screw Heads?

Choose from various screws with diverse head shapes and drive recesses to meet your exact needs.

The two basic screw head types, countersunk and non-countersunk, include various unique designs. Your chosen head shape or style can either serve a functional or decorative purpose. The drive recess or style is ultimately based on the tool you use during installation.

Countersunk Screw Head Styles

Screws with an angular shape underneath the head will require countersinking to help prevent splitting wood when you drill or use force. Countersunk screw head styles sit flush against a surface with little or no protruding parts.

These designs mainly consist of:

  • Flat: Flat heads sit entirely flush with the material’s surface, preventing things from catching on them. Use a screw cover to hide the flat screw head completely — these plastic caps can match the color of most wood and plastic laminates.
  • Oval: Sometimes called raised screw heads, oval heads have a similar angle to flat heads and therefore require countersinking. This decorative dome-shaped head is often used for switch coverings.
  • Bugle: Bugle heads are used primarily on drywall, wood decking and plasterboard screws. This shape reduces damage by distributing stress over a wider surface than flat heads.

Flat and oval heads generally require a pilot hole before you can drive them. Bugle heads are self-drilling — automatically compressing drywall paper and gypsum to form a countersunk hole during installation.

Non-Countersunk Screw Head Styles

flat screws don't need countersinking

Screws that are flat under the head don’t need countersinking. While countersunk screws have little or no protruding parts, non-countersunk screw heads are fully exposed on the surface.

Non-countersunk heads have the widest variety:

  • Binding: This slightly domed screw head is designed with male and female sides that screw into one another. Binding heads are typically used to hold together swatches, large manuals and other bookbinding projects, though they can also have electrical applications.
  • Button: Button screws are a rounded design typically used in socket-driven screws that have recently grown in popularity with Torx drive recesses, too.
  • Domed: The flat inner part helps this dome-shaped head sit flush on the surface. Dome heads are a popular screw head type used to enhance various projects with an appealing aesthetic.
  • Pan: Used in many applications that require a flat-bottomed screw, pan heads are the most common type of rounded screws. You can successfully substitute pan heads for other round styles.
  • Round: Although this design is becoming less common, round screw heads offer another alternative for creating a rounded appearance.
  • Fillister: Fillister heads have a slightly rounded top and tall cylindrical sides. The smaller diameter and higher profile give fillister heads a deeper drive slot than round or pan head screws.
  • Truss: Typically used for sheet metal, truss heads have a wider and slightly rounded surface. They generally provide a lower profile and larger bearing surface than round or pan heads.
  • Flange: Whether the head is circular or hexed, this style’s main appeal is the circular flange directly underneath the head. For specific projects, this flange can even take the place of a washer.
  • Hex: Designed to allow for greater torque, hex heads typically require a wrench or socket to install the screw or bolt. Apply force against the screw head’s outside to drive this head shape.
  • Socket cap: These heads are unique to socket drive recesses and install flush against the surface. With easy access to the drive, socket cap heads provide a smooth appearance despite being a non-countersunk style.
  • Square: Square heads are used in bolts and screws. They typically require a wrench for installation and removal.

There are also certain head styles — including slotted hex, hex washer, slotted hex washer and round washer — which combine features to create new non-countersunk shapes.

Different Driving Recesses

Drive recess indicates the kind of tool needed to install or remove the screw. The different screw drive types include:

  • Slotted.
  • Phillips.
  • Phillips tamper-resistant.
  • Combination.
  • Hex external.
  • Hex internal.
  • Hex tamper-resistant.
  • Square recess.
  • Square recess tamper-resistant.
  • Quadrex.
  • Pozidriv.
  • Torx.
  • Torx tamper-resistant.
  • Torx Plus.
  • Torx Plus tamper-resistant.
  • Tri-wing.
  • Spanner.

What Are the Screw Drive Types Designed to Do?

Screw drive varieties are designed for various capabilities, including tampering prevention, stability during installation, reliability in application and strength for high-torque insertion. We’ll explain the features and benefits of all screw options, so you can decide which you need:

Slotted

Slotted drive screws are perhaps the simplest you’ll find. This common type of screw drive has a straight line through the middle. They are driven using flat head screwdrivers or drills with flat head bits. They are common for projects that use hand-driven tools or require little torque.

The challenge with slotted screws — common though they might be — is that it can sometimes be challenging to stabilize the screw during installation. That is, it’s easy for your screwdriver or drill to slip when driving a slotted screw. For that reason, slotted screws are still commonly used — but they’re generally on the decline, especially for contractors and others who need to drive many screws as quickly as possible.

Phillips

What is the best type of screw drive? Many would say the Phillips drive screw, characterized by a pointed tip, tapered flanks and rounded corners. The Phillips screw is more commonly used than a slotted screw because it’s more stable with four contact points. The Phillips drive design was made to perform better with screwdrivers.

Most anyone has a Phillips-head screwdriver sitting around they can use to drive Phillips screws, and the sizing of Phillips drill bits and screwdrivers is relatively straightforward. You’ll come across #1, #2 and #3 Phillips drives, though #2 is the most common size.

Phillips Tamper-Resistant

A Phillips tamper-resistant screw is just like a Phillips drive screw with one big exception. It includes a small pin in the center of the screw drive that prevents — you guessed it — tampering.

Phillips tamper-resistant drives are a little more obscure because you have to have the right tools to install and remove them. Also, tamper-resistant screws aren’t nearly as strong as regular Phillips drives. They are challenging to use in high-torque applications and cannot be made to meet high strength standards.

Combination

You can use both slotted and Phillips screwdrivers to drive a combination recess. This function can be highly convenient, though it lacks the same tamper-resistant quality as other, more secure designs.

Hex External

An external hex screw requires a wrench or socket to install the hexagonal drive shape. Some have built-in flanges, which can act as a washer for specific projects. You can get good leverage on external hex screws since you must turn the entire drive from the outside.

Hex Internal

You must use an Allen wrench to drive internal hex screws. When used in furniture installation, the internal hex screws typically come with a matching-sized Allen wrench.

Hex Tamper-Resistant

Similar to other tamper-resistant designs, these hex screws prevent tampering with a small pin in the center of the drive.

Square Recess

Square recess screw drives have a square-shaped socket and protrusion with a slightly tapered tool and socket. This style is becoming increasingly popular for a good reason — the tools used to drive them very rarely slip out of place and are easier to insert.

If you’re interested in working as quickly as possible at woodworking and construction sites, square recess screw drives might be your best bet. They come in two standard sizes — #2 and #3.

Square Recess Tamper-Resistant

This square recess screw drive is similar to regular square recess screw drives with one essential addition — a small pin in the center that prevents tampering, just like the tamper-resistant Phillips drive screws have.

Quadrex

Quadrex screw drives are a unique blend of Phillips drives and square recess drives. They are relatively rare, though they provide a great deal of stability, allowing those using them to work quickly. You can use either a standard Robertson or Phillips tool with a quadrex screw or a quadrex tool that increases the surface area between the fastener and the tool for better torque handling.

Pozidriv

These screw drives are like Phillips drives, though they have four additional contact points that provide greater stabilization. The Pozidriv screw drive has eight contact points altogether formed from two intersected crosses. It’s also unique from Phillips drives because of its 45-degree radical indentations.

It’s rare to find Pozidriv screwdrives in the United States, as they are much more commonly used in Europe.

Torx

Torx screw drives have a six-pointed star shape and are unique and recognizable among screw drive types. This entirely new design is gaining in popularity due to its ability to prevent cam-out. Torx screw drives are often used in the construction and manufacturing of electronic products.

Torx Tamper-Resistant

Like the other tamper-resistant screw drive styles, this means the screw drive design includes a small pin to prevent tampering.

Torx designs generally offer a greater degree of security since they have a unique removal method. A Torx driver is required to install or remove standard Torx screws, meaning an even more special driver is needed for tamper-resistant varieties.

Torx Plus

Torx Plus screws are much like Torx screws, but their design creates a larger contact area between the screw drive  and the tool used to drive it. This recess produces greater torque and greater ease in driving the screw, even at high speeds. Though this design is new, it’s becoming more popular.

Torx Plus Tamper-Resistant

With a Torx Plus tamper-resistant, you get the greater contact area for greater torque, plus the small pin in the center of the drive that prevents tampering. It differs from the standard Torx Plus design because it is a five-pointed star. They are common in high-security applications, like correctional facilities.

Tri-Wing

Tri-Wing screw types are somewhere between a slotted and Phillips drive. They have three grooves that are slightly curved and come in #1, #2 and #3 sizes. Though this screw drive type is exceedingly rare, its deep grooves allow you to apply more force than other screws.

Spanner

Spanner screws feature two holes or two slots used to lock into a screwdriver or drill bit for installation. They are used to avoid tampering without sacrificing the finished look of flat head screws.

Learn More About Screw Head Types at All Points Fasteners

At All Points Fasteners, we offer a vast selection of different screw heads with varying shapes, dimensions and specifications — you enjoy fast, easy access to the fasteners you need for the project at hand. We even specialize in helping our customers track down unusual and hard-to-find fasteners. If you can’t find what you’re looking for in our selection, get in touch with our customer service team for assistance.

Browse our selection of different types of screw head shapes to find your perfect fastening solution today. For more information, contact us or call 800-483-6354.

How to Use Self-Tapping Wood Screws

What Are Self-Tapping Screws

In any type of construction job, knowing the different kinds of screws available is essential. Certain projects require specific fasteners and self-tapping screws are one of the many options you can use. These fasteners have cutting threads on their shanks and sharp-pointed or drill pointed tips that allow them to drive into a material and cut their own mating threads unlike a machine screw which requires a nut. Many contractors love using these fasteners because they make attaching materials like wood so much easier. 

Understanding screws and their uses lets you work faster and more efficiently. At All Points Fasteners, we distribute a variety of self-tapping screws and our knowledgeable team is always happy to provide information on how to use our products. Whether you’re working on HVAC jobs, installing gutters or roofing a house, we’ve got the fasteners you need to get the job done.

What Is a Deck Screw?

Deck screws are a type of wood screw with a specific coating on them for working with treated wood. Other fasteners can react to the natural resins in lumber, causing stains over time. Using deck screws helps prevent this reaction thanks to the chemical makeup of their outer layer. These fasteners are ideal for protecting the integrity and appearance of your wood decking.

Projects where wood screws are useful include:

  • Putting together decks
  • Building cabinets or furniture
  • Making assemblies with plywood

True wood screws typically have an unthreaded area of the shank below the head, which allows for a tighter grip since the screw can spin freely in the outer layer of material and impart more tension at the bottom.  Wood screws are self-tapping as well, tapping their own thread into the wood, making them perfect for any woodworking job. 

A type 17 point, also known as an auger point, is a feature on many wood screws which eliminates the need to drill a small pilot hole before inserting your fastener.  This allows the threads to begin cutting without having to displace material to accommodate the shank’s diameter. Power drills, rather than impact drills, are best  to install these fasteners. 

All Points Fasteners has a variety of self-tapping wood screws to choose from. Our reliable customer service representatives know how to assist you in finding what you need. 

Self-Drilling Screws for Wood 

Many people use the terms self-tapping and self-drilling interchangeably, but these labels have different meanings. Self-drilling screws are fasteners with drill bit tips, manufactured mainly for metal to metal applications.  Their threads ALSO make them self-tapping screws since their threads tap their own mating threads into the material.  There are only two type of self drilling screws that are designed to be used with wood.

  • reduced points – very small drill bit tips that drill smaller diameter holes than the outside diameter of the screw.  This allows the larger outside thread to tap in to the wood.  Normal drill bit tips will drill a hole basically the same width as the diameter of the outside thread of the screw, which will allow the screw to pull out of the material since the thread can’t tap.
  • reamer tek screws – wood to metal screws.  These screws have small ‘wings’ above the tip of the self-drilling screw which will ‘ream’ out the wood so that the threads of the screw won’t get bound up by the wood before the screw hits the metal.  Once the screw starts drilling through the metal, the ‘wings’ will break off.

Buy Self-Tapping Wood Screws in the Quantity You Need

Whether you’re looking for self-drilling wood screws or another type of self-tapping screw, All Points Fasteners can help you find what you need with our large selection. We will work diligently to build a relationship with you throughout your experience with us. 

You can fill out our contact form today to get a customized quote for the fasteners you need.  

 

Installing Drywall Anchors – Tips & Tricks

How to Install Drywall Anchors

When hanging artwork, shelves, TVs or other heavier items on hollow walls, you can drastically increase their security by installing wall anchors.
Anchors reduce the chance of the hung materials becoming too heavy for the screw to bear, and they also help to cut down the chances of damaging the surrounding wall. Once you sort out the details, installing drywall anchors and screws is an easy task anyone can accomplish with the appropriate tools.

What Types of Drywall Anchors Can You Choose From?
Before drilling headfirst into your wall, you’ll need to analyze the different types of drywall anchors to determine the best fit for your situation.
Some popular models include:

  • Hollow Wall Anchor: Also called “Molly” anchors, hollow wall anchors will often see use in medium-duty applications. They’re formed using a machine screw that’s been threaded through a slotted metal sleeve. Tightening the screw will cause the sleeve to expand, and its spread will rest against the inside of the wall to disperse the screw’s load. These anchors can usually hold around 50 pounds in 1/2-inch drywall.
  •  Toggle Bolts: “Butterfly” anchors are a classic type, and they’re arguably the strongest type of drywall anchors. The metal sleeves utilize two spring-loaded wings that open inside the wall. You need to fold back the wings and then insert the unit into the wall, and it will then spread back out to create a sturdy hold. Different models give you different holding capacities. Slender bolts can hold up to 30 pounds, while thicker iterations can hold more than 50.
  •  Plastic Screw Anchors: You’ll most often see plastic anchors for light-to-medium usage, making them exceedingly common. Its cost-efficient hardware that gradually expands as you thread the screw.

Tips for Installing Drywall Anchors

Once you’ve decided what type of drywall anchor you’re using, you’re ready to get to work. Here are five tips to consider when going through the process.

1. Find the Right Spot

As opposed to other mounting jobs, you can avoid using studs and instead pick anywhere that you feel comfortable. If you’re hanging multiple items, measure out the distances accurately to avoid overcrowding. Mark the desired spots with a pencil, then break out your drill.

2. Use an Appropriately Sized Drill Bit

Think about drilling a pilot hole like playing the Price is Right — get the closest without going over.

Your drill bit should nearly mirror the diameter of the anchor, but try to keep it a tad smaller. That slight size disparity creates a better hold when compared to larger holes, which will be too loose for the anchor to grasp. If you’re feeling weary about the process, start at a reasonably small drill bit size, test the fit and move up to the next size until you find your proper match.

3. Prepare the Screw and Anchor

If you’re using toggle bolts or hollow wall anchors, begin threading the screw in before installing them to give it a good headstart.

4. Secure the Anchor

You can then firmly press the wall anchor into the wall. For toggle bolts, you should hear the wings snap into place. When installing plastic anchors or molly anchors you should be able to slide them all the way in without any difficulties. If your plastic anchors need a push, you can lightly tap them with a hammer to get them flush with the wall. Be careful not to swing too hard, as you could damage the wall.

5. Drill the Screws

You can then drill the screws into place. Approach the screws from a 90-degree angle to ensure they go in straight, and drill slowly to prevent stipping the unit. The screw head should sit flush with the anchor head.

Find Your Drywall Anchors and Screws at All Points Fasteners

Now that you know how to install drywall anchors and screws, you can procure the best hardware for the job at All Points Fasteners. We offer free samples, monthly deals and custom requests to create a stress-free experience. Browse our different types of drywall anchors today and contact us to ask any questions you might have.

Four Common Materials Screws Are Made of and Which to Use

Screws are vital to the success of many different projects, whether you’re a do-it-yourself enthusiast or a service industry professional. However, you should consider some critical areas before you invest in screws for your next job. In this guide, we will answer all of your questions about screws:

  • Does it matter how screws are made?
  • What are screws made of?
  • What does the coating on screws do?
  • How do I decide what screw to use?

All Points Fasteners has the strongest screws and fasteners you need for your projects. Contact us today to learn more.

How Are Screws Made?

There are two different manufacturing processes for making screws. Most screws are made with the thread rolling method. Machining is used to make small or specialized screws that cannot be made by thread rolling.

The first step in making a screw with the thread rolling method is called “cold heading.” A wire is fed into a machine to straighten it, then cut it to length. The machine then cuts the head into the desired shape.

There are three techniques that can be used to cut the blank screw to give it threading:

  • Reciprocating die: There are two flat dies — one is stationary, and the other moves back and forth. The screw is rolled between the two dies.
  • Centerless cylindrical die: The screw is rolled between two or three round dies to create the thread.
  • Planetary rotary die: As the screw is held stationary, several die-cutting machines spin it around.

 Between these two screw manufacturing processes, thread rolling is better. The screws are more durable and high quality, avoiding weaknesses in the metal. The screw threads are placed precisely as well, so all screws are the same.

What Are Screws Made Of?

Screws can be made from all sorts of materials, yet there are some that are more popular than the others. The four most common screw materials are:

  • Steel: This is by far the most common material used for manufacturing screws, and there’s a simple explanation for why — steel is less expensive than some other screw material options.
  • Copper: Copper screws are good for fighting against corrosion. If a screw is going to be exposed to the elements, copper helps to ensure the screw performs durably over the long-term.
  • Aluminum: Aluminum isn’t as durable as other materials, but it does have one thing going for it — its weight. Aluminum is just about the lightest weight fastener you can find.
  • Titanium: When you need a blend of strength and lightness, go with titanium. You’ll often pay a premium for titanium screws, but that extra cost pays off big time when you need a fastener that is robust but doesn’t weigh much.

What About Coatings?

Screws are often coated to make them even better by giving them desirable qualities. Screw coatings open up a vast number of possibilities when you’re seeking the right fastener for a specific situation. For example, screws can be coated in copper, ceramic, zinc and other materials, which can provide extra strength, extra protection against corrosion or even an aesthetic quality that might otherwise be missing.

For example, a zinc-plated steel screw will better fight corrosion than a steel screw on its own. Likewise, a copper-plated screw may look more attractive in a prominent place than a steel screw would.

Which Screw Should I Use?

No two kinds of screws are alike. Before you buy screws for your next project, consider these points to make sure you are getting the right kind.

First, identify what materials you are screwing into. Different kinds of screws are made to fasten different materials. For example, the strongest wood screws are made for joining two pieces of wood. Once you’ve determined the material, measure its thickness. You’ll want to get a screw that is long enough to pass through the material and at least halfway into the next for a secure grip.

The next consideration is material. This decision will be based on where you plan to use the screw — indoors or outdoors. For an indoor project, you may be able to use a less expensive screw that looks pleasing if it will be visible. Outdoor projects need certain kinds of screws since they will be exposed to temperature changes and moisture. Then, consider the coating options to gain even more ideal qualities.

Find High-Quality Screws at All Points Fasteners

Now that you know everything you need to know about screws, it’s time to find the perfect screws for your next job. Are you ready to secure high-quality materials for your next job? Find them in our selection at All Points Fasteners.

We pride ourselves on offering a vast and varied selection of screws made of different materials that match particular specifications and feature various types of coatings. When you’re looking for something specific for a unique job at hand, we have the solution. If we happen to not have the screw you need, we’ll find it for you.

In addition to our wide selection, you’ll find competitive prices, fast shipping and outstanding customer service when you choose All Points Fasteners. We are dedicated to making sure you get exactly what you need as quickly as possible.

Browse our inventory of different screws today, and to learn more about our fasteners,  contact our team with any questions you have. Complete our contact form or call us at 800-483-6354.

 

What Makes a Stronger Zip Screw | Design Features to Consider

Zip Screws: What Makes a Stronger Zip Screw?

We, at All Points, believe that whether you call them Sheet Metal Screws, Self-Piercing, Self-Tapping or Speed Point, whether you are using them for HVAC, Gutter or Siding, one thing is certain, time is money and you can’t waste either. I’m sure there’s nothing more frustrating than balancing on a high pitched roof and having to deal with snapping, misaligned screws. Nothing worse than doing something twice.

Another problem you come across is bombarded with the overwhelming amount of screws to choose from. Well hopefully, we can shed a little light on some choices that are out there.


Here are some things to consider:

Hex Washer Heads: Our Hex Washer Head Screws are very popular in the industry. The Hex Head is desired because of its strength and stability. An important thing to consider is the height of the Hex Head. The higher the Hex Head, the more stable the screw. The drill chuck has a broader surface to use to reduce the tension placed on the head of the screw. Since the grip is more secure, there is a much lower chance of stripping the screw head. Which I’m sure you know the nightmare trying to remove a stripped screw head can be. In addition with a high performance hex head will help secure the chuck which will help stabilize the drilling and prevent “wobbling”.

Fillet: This feature strengthens the screw without increasing the size of the screw shaft.

Dacroment Salt Spray: This is a treatment that help to slow the natural oxidation of the metal. This is such a fantastic feature, especially since the forecasts are pointing to another icy, wet winter though out the entire U.S and a good part of Canada. (Credit to www.farmersalmanac.com)

Another fact to keep in mind is the type of screw you are looking for. Again, it will save time and money choose the right screw for the right job. For example, a #10 HWH Screw and a #8 HWH Screw will both work for Gutter Instillation, however, with the wood used in current construction projects have more knots than wood from twenty years ago. The #10 HWH has a thicker shaft and the threads are closer together, which slows the screw rotation. The slower rotation causes the screw to self-drill at a more controlled speed. This allows it to drill through knottier, denser wood, where as a #8 HWH has a thinner screw shaft and closer drill threads which increases the chance of snapping and stripping if used for the wrong application.

Our last suggestion to consider is the material the screw is made of. There are a few to choose from. First there is the Stainless Steel/Copper Plated Screw. This screw works really well with Copper Gutters. This screw is made with a 4/10 gauge steel allows this screw to be used with a magnetized drill chuck.

Another type of screw that works well with Metal Roofs, are Copper Screws. These screw more closely match the Copper Roof. They are made with a 18-8 gauge metal which means there is a higher percentage of copper. This means they are not magnetic, but they better match the natural patina of the copper roof over time.

Stainless Steel screw are another great option. Not only are they strong and durable, but they can be easily used with a magnetized drill chuck. They can be painted to match a lot of the popular colors of the newest styles of today’s metal roofs. Its durability is also a great option for the tiny house trends that becoming a creative option of mobile living.

Hopefully you have found this information informative and useful. With the trends of construction constantly changing, it’s hard to know what is out there. Good thing here at All Points, we are here to answer any questions you may have.