How to Install Gutter Screws | What’s the Difference & What to Use

How to Install Gutter Screws

Gutters are crucial features on any home, which means they need to be secured and well-maintained. Without a strong gutter system, your home can succumb to roof damage, siding damage and erosion issues around the foundation. Gutter nails have been a popular method for attaching gutters, but gutter screws offer certain advantages that can create a better overall system.

Differences in Gutter Nails vs. Screws

The primary difference between gutter nails and screws is that the latter produces a much better hold. Nails are affordable and easy to install, but they’re also prone to gradual slippage as gutters endure repeated water flow. When they come loose, the gutters can hang away from the roof, which creates openings for the rainfall to leak past. This occurrence is what can cause the issues mentioned above.

Screws, with their durable threads and construction, will maintain their hold longer and withstand environmental factors thanks to their corrosion-resistance qualities.

What Screws to Use for Gutters

For a tighter hold, you’ll find that most gutter screws utilize a hex head, which can be slotted or unslotted to allow for flathead screwdriver access. Typically, you’ll need longer hardware to replace nails appropriately, but the size will vary depending on your gutter’s specifications.

Considering the material of your gutter — which is typically made of steel, aluminum and copper — you can find various finishes to match it. All Points Fasteners carries copper-plated screws, as well as ceramic coatings that boast excellent environmental resistance.

How to Install Your Gutter Screws

Now that you understand the importance of gutter screws and have an idea of which kind you’ll use, follow these four steps to install them.

1. Inspect Your Gutters

If you plan on replacing your gutter nails, you’ll first need to climb up and count the number of nails used, so you can acquire the right amount of screws. You also need to check the state and size of the ferrules, which are the cylindrical objects that house the nail stems.

The screws and ferrules must work together well or else you will not create a secure hold.

2. Acquire the Right Hardware

Take samples of your nails and ferrules, as well as information about your gutters, to a local hardware store. You could also send pictures and specs of the samples to an online customer service representative if you want to purchase the parts online. The workers should give you advice and point you in the right direction.

3. Tear Out the Nails

Carefully remove the nails to avoid losing the parts in your yard or damaging the roof and gutter. A claw hammer is the usually the easiest method for performing this task.

4. Begin Screw Installation

Insert the screw into the existing hole in the gutter face, and then the ferrule over it. It’s critical that you do not drill the screw into the existing nail hole. Instead, position the tip just above the preexisting hole and then force it into the fascia (roof). Most screws have self-tapping bits, so you don’t need a separate part to create a pilot hole.

Do not overtighten the screws, as that can damage the gutters and decrease their overall strength.

Find Your Gutter Screws at All Points Fasteners

The dedicated experts at All Points Fasteners will assist you in finding the right gutter screws for your job. We offer free samples, monthly deals and custom requests to provide the flexibility you’ll struggle to find elsewhere. Browse our online inventory today, or chat with us to ask any questions you might have.

What Makes a Stronger Zip Screw | Design Features to Consider

Zip Screws: What Makes a Stronger Zip Screw?

We, at All Points, believe that whether you call them Sheet Metal Screws, Self-Piercing, Self-Tapping or Speed Point, whether you are using them for HVAC, Gutter or Siding, one thing is certain, time is money and you can’t waste either. I’m sure there’s nothing more frustrating than balancing on a high pitched roof and having to deal with snapping, misaligned screws. Nothing worse than doing something twice.

Another problem you come across is bombarded with the overwhelming amount of screws to choose from. Well hopefully, we can shed a little light on some choices that are out there.


Here are some things to consider:

Hex Washer Heads: Our Hex Washer Head Screws are very popular in the industry. The Hex Head is desired because of its strength and stability. An important thing to consider is the height of the Hex Head. The higher the Hex Head, the more stable the screw. The drill chuck has a broader surface to use to reduce the tension placed on the head of the screw. Since the grip is more secure, there is a much lower chance of stripping the screw head. Which I’m sure you know the nightmare trying to remove a stripped screw head can be. In addition with a high performance hex head will help secure the chuck which will help stabilize the drilling and prevent “wobbling”.

Fillet: This feature strengthens the screw without increasing the size of the screw shaft.

Dacroment Salt Spray: This is a treatment that help to slow the natural oxidation of the metal. This is such a fantastic feature, especially since the forecasts are pointing to another icy, wet winter though out the entire U.S and a good part of Canada. (Credit to www.farmersalmanac.com)

Another fact to keep in mind is the type of screw you are looking for. Again, it will save time and money choose the right screw for the right job. For example, a #10 HWH Screw and a #8 HWH Screw will both work for Gutter Instillation, however, with the wood used in current construction projects have more knots than wood from twenty years ago. The #10 HWH has a thicker shaft and the threads are closer together, which slows the screw rotation. The slower rotation causes the screw to self-drill at a more controlled speed. This allows it to drill through knottier, denser wood, where as a #8 HWH has a thinner screw shaft and closer drill threads which increases the chance of snapping and stripping if used for the wrong application.

Our last suggestion to consider is the material the screw is made of. There are a few to choose from. First there is the Stainless Steel/Copper Plated Screw. This screw works really well with Copper Gutters. This screw is made with a 4/10 gauge steel allows this screw to be used with a magnetized drill chuck.

Another type of screw that works well with Metal Roofs, are Copper Screws. These screw more closely match the Copper Roof. They are made with a 18-8 gauge metal which means there is a higher percentage of copper. This means they are not magnetic, but they better match the natural patina of the copper roof over time.

Stainless Steel screw are another great option. Not only are they strong and durable, but they can be easily used with a magnetized drill chuck. They can be painted to match a lot of the popular colors of the newest styles of today’s metal roofs. Its durability is also a great option for the tiny house trends that becoming a creative option of mobile living.

Hopefully you have found this information informative and useful. With the trends of construction constantly changing, it’s hard to know what is out there. Good thing here at All Points, we are here to answer any questions you may have.

Learn More About Gutter Zip Screws with Our Product Primer

Gutter Zip Screws – Our New Primer!

Gutter zip screws primer. We are proud to present the third in our series of product primers.

Gutter screws. They’re not what they were during the 80’s or 90’s. Like everything else, time has evolved from what used to be a standard 8 x 1 1/2 hex washer needlepoint zip screws to our beefy 10 x 1 1/2 hex washer head needlepoint zip screws with a high profile 1/4″ hex head and a fillet underneath the head to give it extra strength. One nice feature of this screw is that even though it has a #10 shank it has a 1/4 hex head which is standard with a #8 screw. Since the gutter and siding industry uses #8 screws, the #8 style head was used on this screw so that the installers wouldn’t have to constantly be changing the chucks in their drills from 1/4 inch to 5/16 inch magnetic drivers. In addition, there is a high profile head on the screws so that they will stay in the drivers and not fall out.

Another option for zip screws used in siding and gutters, is the choice to have a ceramic coating, anywhere from 500 to 1200 salt spray hours of testing,

Screws with this Dacromet® coating are perfect for areas that are exposed to moisture and wet weather. They are also available with the heads painted to match popular siding colors.

For copper gutters, there are many more options available than what was in the past. Stainless steel zip screws, magnetic and non-magnetic, and copper plated stainless zip screws match the copper gutters.

So many more choices for gutter screws!