How to Install Gutter Screws | What’s the Difference & What to Use

How to Install Gutter Screws

Gutters are crucial features on any home, which means they need to be secured and well-maintained. Without a strong gutter system, your home can succumb to roof damage, siding damage and erosion issues around the foundation. Gutter nails have been a popular method for attaching gutters, but gutter screws offer certain advantages that can create a better overall system.

Differences in Gutter Nails vs. Screws

The primary difference between gutter nails and screws is that the latter produces a much better hold. Nails are affordable and easy to install, but they’re also prone to gradual slippage as gutters endure repeated water flow. When they come loose, the gutters can hang away from the roof, which creates openings for the rainfall to leak past. This occurrence is what can cause the issues mentioned above.

Screws, with their durable threads and construction, will maintain their hold longer and withstand environmental factors thanks to their corrosion-resistance qualities.

What Screws to Use for Gutters and Downspouts

For a tighter hold, you’ll find that most gutter and downspout screws utilize a hex head, which can be slotted or unslotted to allow for flathead screwdriver access. Typically, you’ll need longer hardware to replace nails appropriately, but the size will vary depending on your gutter’s specifications.

Considering the material of your gutter — which is typically made of steel, aluminum and copper — you can find various finishes to match it. All Points Fasteners carries copper-plated screws, as well as ceramic coatings that boast excellent environmental resistance.

How to Install Your Gutter Screws

Now that you understand the importance of gutter screws and have an idea of which kind you’ll use, follow these four steps to install them.

1. Inspect Your Gutters

If you plan on replacing your gutter nails, you’ll first need to climb up and count the number of nails used, so you can acquire the right amount of screws. You also need to check the state and size of the ferrules, which are the cylindrical objects that house the nail stems.

The screws and ferrules must work together well or else you will not create a secure hold.

2. Acquire the Right Hardware

Take samples of your nails and ferrules, as well as information about your gutters, to a local hardware store. You could also send pictures and specs of the samples to an online customer service representative if you want to purchase the parts online. The workers should give you advice and point you in the right direction.

3. Tear Out the Nails

Carefully remove the nails to avoid losing the parts in your yard or damaging the roof and gutter. A claw hammer is the usually the easiest method for performing this task.

4. Begin Screw Installation

Insert the screw into the existing hole in the gutter face, and then the ferrule over it. It’s critical that you do not drill the screw into the existing nail hole. Instead, position the tip just above the preexisting hole and then force it into the fascia (roof). Most screws have self-tapping bits, so you don’t need a separate part to create a pilot hole.

Do not overtighten the screws, as that can damage the gutters and decrease their overall strength.

Find Your Gutter Screws at All Points Fasteners

The dedicated experts at All Points Fasteners will assist you in finding the right gutter screws for your job. We offer free samples, monthly deals and custom requests to provide the flexibility you’ll struggle to find elsewhere. Browse our online inventory today, or chat with us to ask any questions you might have.

Installing Drywall Anchors – Tips & Tricks

How to Install Drywall Anchors

When hanging artwork, shelves, TVs or other heavier items on hollow walls, you can drastically increase their security by installing wall anchors.
Anchors reduce the chance of the hung materials becoming too heavy for the screw to bear, and they also help to cut down the chances of damaging the surrounding wall. Once you sort out the details, installing drywall anchors and screws is an easy task anyone can accomplish with the appropriate tools.

What Types of Drywall Anchors Can You Choose From?
Before drilling headfirst into your wall, you’ll need to analyze the different types of drywall anchors to determine the best fit for your situation.
Some popular models include:

  • Hollow Wall Anchor: Also called “Molly” anchors, hollow wall anchors will often see use in medium-duty applications. They’re formed using a machine screw that’s been threaded through a slotted metal sleeve. Tightening the screw will cause the sleeve to expand, and its spread will rest against the inside of the wall to disperse the screw’s load. These anchors can usually hold around 50 pounds in 1/2-inch drywall.
  •  Toggle Bolts: “Butterfly” anchors are a classic type, and they’re arguably the strongest type of drywall anchors. The metal sleeves utilize two spring-loaded wings that open inside the wall. You need to fold back the wings and then insert the unit into the wall, and it will then spread back out to create a sturdy hold. Different models give you different holding capacities. Slender bolts can hold up to 30 pounds, while thicker iterations can hold more than 50.
  •  Plastic Screw Anchors: You’ll most often see plastic anchors for light-to-medium usage, making them exceedingly common. Its cost-efficient hardware that gradually expands as you thread the screw.

Tips for Installing Drywall Anchors

Once you’ve decided what type of drywall anchor you’re using, you’re ready to get to work. Here are five tips to consider when going through the process.

1. Find the Right Spot

As opposed to other mounting jobs, you can avoid using studs and instead pick anywhere that you feel comfortable. If you’re hanging multiple items, measure out the distances accurately to avoid overcrowding. Mark the desired spots with a pencil, then break out your drill.

2. Use an Appropriately Sized Drill Bit

Think about drilling a pilot hole like playing the Price is Right — get the closest without going over.

Your drill bit should nearly mirror the diameter of the anchor, but try to keep it a tad smaller. That slight size disparity creates a better hold when compared to larger holes, which will be too loose for the anchor to grasp. If you’re feeling weary about the process, start at a reasonably small drill bit size, test the fit and move up to the next size until you find your proper match.

3. Prepare the Screw and Anchor

If you’re using toggle bolts or hollow wall anchors, begin threading the screw in before installing them to give it a good headstart.

4. Secure the Anchor

You can then firmly press the wall anchor into the wall. For toggle bolts, you should hear the wings snap into place. When installing plastic anchors or molly anchors you should be able to slide them all the way in without any difficulties. If your plastic anchors need a push, you can lightly tap them with a hammer to get them flush with the wall. Be careful not to swing too hard, as you could damage the wall.

5. Drill the Screws

You can then drill the screws into place. Approach the screws from a 90-degree angle to ensure they go in straight, and drill slowly to prevent stipping the unit. The screw head should sit flush with the anchor head.

Find Your Drywall Anchors and Screws at All Points Fasteners

Now that you know how to install drywall anchors and screws, you can procure the best hardware for the job at All Points Fasteners. We offer free samples, monthly deals and custom requests to create a stress-free experience. Browse our different types of drywall anchors today and contact us to ask any questions you might have.

Four Common Materials Screws Are Made of and Which to Use

Screws are vital to the success of many different projects, whether you’re a do-it-yourself enthusiast or a service industry professional. However, you should consider some critical areas before you invest in screws for your next job. In this guide, we will answer all of your questions about screws:

  • Does it matter how screws are made?
  • What are screws made of?
  • What does the coating on screws do?
  • How do I decide what screw to use?

All Points Fasteners has the strongest screws and fasteners you need for your projects. Contact us today to learn more.

How Are Screws Made?

There are two different manufacturing processes for making screws. Most screws are made with the thread rolling method. Machining is used to make small or specialized screws that cannot be made by thread rolling.

The first step in making a screw with the thread rolling method is called “cold heading.” A wire is fed into a machine to straighten it, then cut it to length. The machine then cuts the head into the desired shape.

There are three techniques that can be used to cut the blank screw to give it threading:

  • Reciprocating die: There are two flat dies — one is stationary, and the other moves back and forth. The screw is rolled between the two dies.
  • Centerless cylindrical die: The screw is rolled between two or three round dies to create the thread.
  • Planetary rotary die: As the screw is held stationary, several die-cutting machines spin it around.

 Between these two screw manufacturing processes, thread rolling is better. The screws are more durable and high quality, avoiding weaknesses in the metal. The screw threads are placed precisely as well, so all screws are the same.

What Are Screws Made Of?

Screws can be made from all sorts of materials, yet there are some that are more popular than the others. The four most common screw materials are:

  • Steel: This is by far the most common material used for manufacturing screws, and there’s a simple explanation for why — steel is cheap. The only drawback to steel is that it is weaker than some of the other options on this list.
  • Copper: Copper screws are good for fighting against corrosion. If a screw is going to be exposed to the elements, copper helps to ensure the screw performs durably over the long-term.
  • Aluminum: Aluminum isn’t as durable as other materials, but it does have one thing going for it — its weight. Aluminum is just about the lightest weight fastener you can find.
  • Titanium: When you need a blend of strength and lightness, go with titanium. You’ll often pay a premium for titanium screws, but that extra cost pays off big time when you need a fastener that is robust but doesn’t weigh much.

What About Coatings?

Screws are often coated to make them even better by giving them desirable qualities. Screw coatings open up a vast number of possibilities when you’re seeking the right fastener for a specific situation. For example, screws can be coated in copper, ceramic, zinc and other materials, which can provide extra strength, extra protection against corrosion or even an aesthetic quality that might otherwise be missing.

For example, a zinc-plated steel screw will better fight corrosion than a steel screw on its own. Likewise, a copper-plated screw may look more attractive in a prominent place than a steel screw would.

Which Screw Should I Use?

No two kinds of screws are alike. Before you buy screws for your next project, consider these points to make sure you are getting the right kind.

First, identify what materials you are screwing into. Different kinds of screws are made to fasten different materials. For example, the strongest wood screws are made for joining two pieces of wood. Once you’ve determined the material, measure its thickness. You’ll want to get a screw that is long enough to pass through the material and at least halfway into the next for a secure grip.

The next consideration is material. This decision will be based on where you plan to use the screw — indoors or outdoors. For an indoor project, you may be able to use a less expensive screw that looks pleasing if it will be visible. Outdoor projects need certain kinds of screws since they will be exposed to temperature changes and moisture. Then, consider the coating options to gain even more ideal qualities.

Find High-Quality Screws at All Points Fasteners

Now that you know everything you need to know about screws, it’s time to find the perfect screws for your next job. Are you ready to secure high-quality materials for your next job? Find them in our selection at All Points Fasteners.

We pride ourselves on offering a vast and varied selection of screws made of different materials that match particular specifications and feature various types of coatings. When you’re looking for something specific for a unique job at hand, we have the solution. If we happen to not have the screw you need, we’ll find it for you.

In addition to our wide selection, you’ll find competitive prices, fast shipping and outstanding customer service when you choose All Points Fasteners. We are dedicated to making sure you get exactly what you need as quickly as possible.

Browse our inventory of different screws today, and to learn more about our fasteners,  contact our team with any questions you have. Complete our contact form or call us at 800-483-6354.

How Does a Screw Work | Different Types & Uses

How Does a Screw Work?

The world of screws is vast, and you’ll find no shortage of different options when you shop for screws for your next project. How does a screw work, exactly, and what are different types of screws used for? Here’s a primer on the different types of screws available to you, as well as some key information as you evaluate what types of screws will work best to meet your needs.

What Is a Screw Used For?

Screws are fasteners for all sorts of construction projects, large and small. The reason there are so many different types of screws is that there are so many different ways objects and materials need to be fastened.

Sometimes screws are classified by the material they are used to fasten. For example, you might find you need concrete screws for fastening objects to concrete, wood screws for fastening objects to wood, or drywall screws for fastening objects to drywall. No one screw or fastening could possibly serve as a one-size-fits-all solution, because there are simply too many different needs and applications for screws and fasteners.

What Are the Different Types of Screws?

Because of how many different ways there are to use screws, you’ll find there are tons of different types of screws. Here are just a few of the different kinds you’ll find when searching for the right solution:

This is just a few of the different types of screws. You may find that the screw you need is classified into one of the categories above, but it’s also categorized by its drive type (Phillips, slotted, combination, star, etc.) or by the shape of its head (oval, flat, button, round, pan, etc.). In some cases, you may find a screw is classified by a combination of terms. For example, you might find that you need a slotted flathead metal screw.

What Is the Difference Between a Self-Tapping Screw and a Normal Screw?

With most screws, you’ll need to drill a pilot hole that creates threads and helps guide the screw into a secure spot. That’s not the case with self-tapping (or self-drilling) screws. When you choose self-tapping screws, there’s no need for a pilot hole. The screw creates its own threads as it is installed.

What’s the benefit of self-tapping screws?

They save tons of time when you’re working on a significant project. For example, if you’re working to fasten objects and you need to use several dozen screws to get the job done, choosing self-tapping screws can significantly decrease the amount of time the project takes you. This is incredibly important in large construction projects where getting the project done on time is of the utmost importance.

Get the Screws You Need at All Points Fasteners

At All Points Fasteners, we work each day with service contractors to ensure they have the screws they need to deliver outstanding results. We specialize in tracking down even the most difficult-to-find fastening solutions — so our clients always have access to exactly what they need.

You find nothing but products of the highest quality in our selection, as well as affordable pricing that helps your project stay under budget.

Browse our vast selection of screws.

What Makes a Stronger Zip Screw | Design Features to Consider

Zip Screws: What Makes a Stronger Zip Screw?

We, at All Points, believe that whether you call them Sheet Metal Screws, Self-Piercing, Self-Tapping or Speed Point, whether you are using them for HVAC, Gutter or Siding, one thing is certain, time is money and you can’t waste either. I’m sure there’s nothing more frustrating than balancing on a high pitched roof and having to deal with snapping, misaligned screws. Nothing worse than doing something twice.

Another problem you come across is bombarded with the overwhelming amount of screws to choose from. Well hopefully, we can shed a little light on some choices that are out there.


Here are some things to consider:

Hex Washer Heads: Our Hex Washer Head Screws are very popular in the industry. The Hex Head is desired because of its strength and stability. An important thing to consider is the height of the Hex Head. The higher the Hex Head, the more stable the screw. The drill chuck has a broader surface to use to reduce the tension placed on the head of the screw. Since the grip is more secure, there is a much lower chance of stripping the screw head. Which I’m sure you know the nightmare trying to remove a stripped screw head can be. In addition with a high performance hex head will help secure the chuck which will help stabilize the drilling and prevent “wobbling”.

Fillet: This feature strengthens the screw without increasing the size of the screw shaft.

Dacroment Salt Spray: This is a treatment that help to slow the natural oxidation of the metal. This is such a fantastic feature, especially since the forecasts are pointing to another icy, wet winter though out the entire U.S and a good part of Canada. (Credit to www.farmersalmanac.com)

Another fact to keep in mind is the type of screw you are looking for. Again, it will save time and money choose the right screw for the right job. For example, a #10 HWH Screw and a #8 HWH Screw will both work for Gutter Instillation, however, with the wood used in current construction projects have more knots than wood from twenty years ago. The #10 HWH has a thicker shaft and the threads are closer together, which slows the screw rotation. The slower rotation causes the screw to self-drill at a more controlled speed. This allows it to drill through knottier, denser wood, where as a #8 HWH has a thinner screw shaft and closer drill threads which increases the chance of snapping and stripping if used for the wrong application.

Our last suggestion to consider is the material the screw is made of. There are a few to choose from. First there is the Stainless Steel/Copper Plated Screw. This screw works really well with Copper Gutters. This screw is made with a 4/10 gauge steel allows this screw to be used with a magnetized drill chuck.

Another type of screw that works well with Metal Roofs, are Copper Screws. These screw more closely match the Copper Roof. They are made with a 18-8 gauge metal which means there is a higher percentage of copper. This means they are not magnetic, but they better match the natural patina of the copper roof over time.

Stainless Steel screw are another great option. Not only are they strong and durable, but they can be easily used with a magnetized drill chuck. They can be painted to match a lot of the popular colors of the newest styles of today’s metal roofs. Its durability is also a great option for the tiny house trends that becoming a creative option of mobile living.

Hopefully you have found this information informative and useful. With the trends of construction constantly changing, it’s hard to know what is out there. Good thing here at All Points, we are here to answer any questions you may have.

Learn More About Gutter Zip Screws with Our Product Primer

Gutter Zip Screws – Our New Primer!

Gutter zip screws primer. We are proud to present the third in our series of product primers.

Gutter screws. They’re not what they were during the 80’s or 90’s. Like everything else, time has evolved from what used to be a standard 8 x 1 1/2 hex washer needlepoint zip screws to our beefy 10 x 1 1/2 hex washer head needlepoint zip screws with a high profile 1/4″ hex head and a fillet underneath the head to give it extra strength. One nice feature of this screw is that even though it has a #10 shank it has a 1/4 hex head which is standard with a #8 screw. Since the gutter and siding industry uses #8 screws, the #8 style head was used on this screw so that the installers wouldn’t have to constantly be changing the chucks in their drills from 1/4 inch to 5/16 inch magnetic drivers. In addition, there is a high profile head on the screws so that they will stay in the drivers and not fall out.

Another option for zip screws used in siding and gutters, is the choice to have a ceramic coating, anywhere from 500 to 1200 salt spray hours of testing,

Screws with this Dacromet® coating are perfect for areas that are exposed to moisture and wet weather. They are also available with the heads painted to match popular siding colors.

For copper gutters, there are many more options available than what was in the past. Stainless steel zip screws, magnetic and non-magnetic, and copper plated stainless zip screws match the copper gutters.

So many more choices for gutter screws!

Is There a New Screw Design Out There for iPhones?

IPHONE New Screws

I’ve always had a secret desire to design some new, never been thought of before zip screw or tek screw so I could be the first to market it to an industry just waiting for a new and better widget!

So, how quickly do you think it’s going to take for some smart entrepreneur will take this from “idea” to “ready for distribution”? Who was it that said “whatever man can conceive, he can achieve”?

As reported in The Register –

Designer Punked Fanbois With Asymmetric Screw
By Richard Chirgwin

For a little while, the Apple press fell over itself to analyze the import of a screw that was reportedly going to lock customers and repairers out of the next iPhone forever. The source of the story has now ‘fessed up that to the hoax that set the wires a-buzz.

Swedish design house Day4 has posted its account of events here. Deciding to test peoples’ gullibility – and the speed with which disinformation could be spread – Lukasz Lindell and his colleagues created an imaginary “asymmetric screw” in a CAD package, grabbed the image, and posted it to Reddit with a fake message saying the pic demonstrated that Apple is “even creating their own screws.” (Day4’s fake screw design)

The result was pick-up by Cult of Mac, and from there it spread like wildfire, Lindell writes:

However, perhaps more interesting than the media pickup – as Lindell notes, the story was treated as a rumour rather than a fact (and Cult of Mac has now noted the hoax without complaint) – was an outcome that falls into “social science” research.

Lindell writes: “With each step further away from the source the perception that this would be true increased. On Reddit, where the original entry was made we see it as a 0 mode, the image was posted, nothing more or less.” However, by the time the story was being discussed and commentated on various blogs and social media outlets, “all doubt is gone”.

He even goes so far as to apologize to anyone who took the story as truth: “we just want to say sorry to you who feel cheated”.


It may have all been a joke, or a experiment of sorts, to see how fast a rumor could spread, but no doubt some smart, far thinking, entrepreneur will figure out a way how to manufacture and market this screw in the near future. How many now common household items actually began as mistakes and it was suddenly realized that they worked wonderfully for applications they were never intended to be used. Life changing inventions….all by accident and not by design.

How about….?

The Slinky

Inventor: Richard Jones
What he was trying to make: A meter designed to monitor power on naval battleships

How he invented: Richard Jones was working with tension springs when one of them fell on the floor. The spring kept bouncing after it hit the ground and the slinky was invented.

Or maybe…..?

Chocolate-Chip Cookies

Inventor: Ruth Wakefield, Owner of the Toll House Inn

What she was trying to make: Regular chocolate cookies

How was it created? While she was mixing up a batch of cookie dough, Ruth Wakefield found out she was almost out of baker’s chocolate. In order to stretch out what little chocolate she had, she broke the sweetened chocolate into small, little pieces and mixed them to the cookie dough expecting them to melt, making her regular chocolate cookies, but they did not and there ya go!

Or, how about..?

Microwave ovens

Inventor: Percy Spencer, engineer at Raytheon Corp
What he was attempting to make: The engineer was conducting a radar related research project with a new vacuum tube

How it was created: when the candy bar in his pocket began to melt during his experiments, he then put popcorn into the machine. And when it started popping, he realized he had a incredible new invention!


Well, I may not have invented it but there definitely are some better tek screws available now than was when I first got started selling screws and All Points Fasteners has them available for sale! There are #4 and #5 tek points available to penetrate thicker metals without snapping the heads off. Tek screws make of non-magnetic stainless steel so they will not rust but with steel tek screws points so that they can drill through metals easier than stainless steel tek screw points which are much softer.

We also have tek screws which are stainless steel but ALSO ceramic coated with 1000 hour salt spray testing for even more protection from rusting.

Finding the Self-Tapping Screw You Need Based on Description!

It’s Not So Difficult Ordering Self-Tapping Screws!

So you picked a self-tapping screw off a job site and it was just what you have been looking for but it didn’t come in a box that was labeled – it was just sitting there on the floor. What do you do? How can you ask for something when you’re not really sure what to ask for? The nice thing is that it isn’t so difficult if you know what dimensions to measure when you are asking your fastener sales representative to help you.

Start describing and measuring from the top of the zip screw or tek screws (check this out) and then head down to the bottom.

First describe the head. Is it a…?

There are other style heads available but these are the most common head styles that you should know. Once you can identify the head style that you are looking for, it makes things much easier.

To identify the shank size of the screw, it’s much easier if your screw is a hex head. When considering the shank size, think dress size. The smaller the number, the thinner the shank. The bigger the number, the thicker the shank.

The standard for the industry is:

• 1/4″ Hex Head = #6 or #7 or #8 shank size
• 5/16″ Hex Head = #10 or #12 shank size
• 3/8″ Hex Head = #14 shank size


Of course there always have to be exceptions just to keep things interesting.
In our case, we have needlepoint screws (aka zip screws) developed especially for the gutter industry with have high profile 1/4″ hex head but #10 washers and #10 body shanks. In the 70’s and 80’s, standard #8 screws worked fine for the gutter industry but when the quality of the wood used for homes changed, it was necessary to increase the thickness of the shanks so that the screws wouldn’t snap when hitting knots in the wood. We also added a filet underneath the head to give the screw a little extra strength.

Next, there is TPI or threads per inch to consider. As a rule of thumb, the less threads per inch, the screw is intended to be used in wood. The more TPI, the screw is meant for metal or metal studs. These are sometimes called out as ‘coarse threaded’ or ‘fine threaded’ screws. If you try and use a coarse threaded screw in metal studs or hard woods, the quality of the screw can’t really be blamed when it snaps although that happens all the time. It is simply misapplication and the more you know what screws were made for what applications, the less problems you will have when using your screws.


Now we get to the points of the screws.

Does the point look like a pencil point?

Does the point look like a drill bit tip?

There are other type points like Type 17’s used with woods and others but the two listed above are the most common.


And lastly, you should remember to state the plating that you need. Zinc plating is most common with under normal situations will last you about two years on average. Hot dipped galvanized is generally five years. But these are old school type plating. We have started stocking Dacronized®, ceramic type plating, which we normally have stocked in 500, 1000 and 1200 hour salt spray tested. They give you extra protection and even are available with the heads painted as well to match exterior applications.

When you are looking at a label on a box, the screws will generally be labeled something like “8-18×1 HWH SDS Z/P”. This would translate to #8
shank, 18 TPI by 1 inch long, hex washer head, self drilling screw (tek type point) zinc plated.

This is not everything that there is to know about self-tapping screws, zip screws and tek screws included, but it will give you a good baseline to start!