The Best Screws Use to Install Copper Gutters

Copper Gutters and the Screws Used to Install Them

If you’re looking for stylish rainwater systems for your home, copper gutters, installed with stainless steel copper plated needlepoint screws, will certainly tick all of the right boxes. Homeowners are continually on the lookout for rainwater systems that offer the striking appearance and adaptability that they demand of their guttering.

There are several reasons for choosing copper gutters for your home. Copper gutters are one of the most resilient and hard-wearing forms of rainwater system on the market and this is an important characteristic for many homeowners. Needless to say, the materials used in the construction of rainwater systems need to be extremely hard-wearing given that they will be buffeted by the elements on a daily basis and copper gutters are certainly one of the most well-equipped to deal with this.

In terms of establishing the most sought-after form of rainwater systems, it is definitely the case that copper gutters are one of the first thoughts that consumers will have when updating their guttering. It is important to realize, however, that copper gutters really should be installed by professionals in the field of guttering because this will ensure that you maximize their performance levels.

The stainless copper plated zip screws to install these gutters come in three different choices. One style is 410 stainless steel (magnetic) which is copper plated. A benefit of using 401 stainless steel is that you will be able to use your magnetic chucks which will make installation easier. A downside is that because there is some carbon steel in the make up of the screw, which makes it magnetic and also a little stronger, there will be some surface rust after time. But being used with copper gutters the effect will blend in with the patina of the copper.

Another choice is 18-8 stainless steel (non-magnetic) copper plated zip screw. Since this style has no carbon steel, no surface rust will develop, however, it will not be magnetic either.

And then there are the pure copper zip screw. These, though, are only available in 8 x 1/2.

Many gutter installers who do copper gutter also use pop rivets which are copper with brass mandrels. The mandrels are made of brass because brass is stronger than pure copper but won’t have a chemical corrosive reaction with the copper gutters. Copper rivets with steel mandrels are pretty common but finding them with brass mandrels can be more challenging.

Whilst copper gutters, installed with stainless steel copper plated zip screws, will cost a little more than other forms of guttering on the market, you certainly get a heightened level of performance for the additional cost. When it comes to getting the best bang for your buck in your purchase of copper gutters, it is best to head online and opt for professionals who can exhibit their credentials with a portfolio of their work.

How Does a Screw Work | Different Types & Uses

When you’re taking on a large project like building a deck or framing a new room, you’ll need an ample supply of screws and other fasteners. If you’re wondering about the different types of screws and when one will work more effectively than another, All Points Fasteners is here to help.

We offer multiple types of screws and have all the information needed to help you use them properly. We’re here to help you get your projects done right and done fast.

How Does a Screw Work?

The world of screws is vast, and you’ll find no shortage of different options when you shop for screws for your next project. How does a screw work?

A screw has the same overall shape as a nail, but it includes a spiraling groove travelling around and down the shaft. The head has several options, including hex, pan, flat and round.  Drives can be slotted or made with a Phillips head design for driving.

When you need to hold two materials or objects together, the groove helps keep the screw in place and the bond secure. To drive the screw into a material, you’ll need a screwdriver or drill that’s compatible with the head design.

There are many different types of screws, and while their exact uses differ, what a screw does best is hold two things together. What are different types of screws used for? Here’s a primer on the different types of screws available to you, as well as some key information as you evaluate what types of screws will work best to meet your needs.

What Is a Screw Used For?

Screws are fasteners for all sorts of construction projects, large and small. The reason there are so many different types of screws is that there are so many different ways objects and materials need to be fastened.

Sometimes screws are classified by the material they are used to fasten. For example, you might find you need concrete screws for fastening objects to concrete, wood screws for fastening objects to wood, or drywall screws for fastening objects to drywall. No one screw or fastening could possibly serve as a one-size-fits-all solution, because there are simply too many different needs and applications for screws and fasteners.

What Are the Different Types of Screws?

Because of how many different ways there are to use screws, you’ll find there are tons of different types of screws. Here are just a few of the different kinds you’ll find when searching for the right solution:

These are just a few of the different types of screws. You may find that the screw you need is classified into one of the categories above, but it’s also categorized by its drive type (Phillips, slotted, combination, star, etc.) or by the shape of its head (oval, flat, button, round, pan, etc.). In some cases, you may find a screw is classified by a combination of terms. For example, you might find that you need a slotted flathead metal screw.

What Is the Difference Between a Self-Tapping Screw and a Normal Screw?

With most screws, you’ll need to drill a pilot hole that creates threads and helps guide the screw into a secure spot. That’s not the case with self-tapping (or self-drilling) screws. When you choose self-tapping screws, there’s no need for a pilot hole. The screw creates its own threads as it is installed and remains tightly in place despite any activity or vibrations.

What’s the benefit of self-tapping screws?

Self-tapping screws save tons of time when you’re working on a significant project. For example, if you’re working to fasten objects and you need to use several dozen screws to get the job done, choosing self-tapping screws can significantly decrease the amount of time the project takes you. This is incredibly important in large construction projects where getting the project done on time is of the utmost importance.

These screws are also reliable, as they hold materials together firmly and have a long service life. Installing self-tapping screws with a coating can also prevent discoloration of the material due to rust or corrosion, making these fasteners ideal for harsh environments.

Get the Screws You Need at All Points Fasteners

At All Points Fasteners, we work each day with service contractors to ensure they have the screws they need to deliver outstanding results. We specialize in tracking down even the most difficult-to-find fastening solutions — so our clients always have access to exactly what they need.

You find nothing but products of the highest quality in our selection, as well as affordable pricing that helps your project stay under budget. We provide domestic quality at an imported price. If you can’t find the right part for your project, let us know and our experts will point you in the right direction. We’re committed to your satisfaction, so we’re always happy to work with you to find the products you need.

Browse our vast selection of screws online today or contact us to learn more.

Self-Tapping Deck Screws

Self-Tapping Deck Screws

Self-tapping screws are the least thought about component when people think of buildings, furniture, cars, bikes or just about anything else you can name. But really, when you think of it, you can’t throw a rock without hitting something put together with screws. Since the job of the screw is to keep things together, quality for this little thought of component is more important than people usually think.

Self-tapping screws are fantastic because of their design. When you begin turning a self-tapping screw, it displaces material around itself to cut its own threads. Since the screw creates the threads, it establishes them in a position that generates resistance to hold itself in place. The threads act like insulation, protecting the screw from loosening under waves of vibration and activity.

This screw also saves you time. It can take hours to drill holes, place traditional bolts and tighten them in place with a washer and nut. With self-tapping screws, you can get the job done much faster. Since these fasteners secure themselves and remain tightly in place, you can save yourself hours of work and enjoy the final product sooner.

One of the lesser-known but not long ago developed model of screws is the decking screw. These screws are meant for installing rails,build framing and fastening decking planks. These high quality self tapping deck screws are ceramic coated to keep the screw form bleeding and discoloring the wood.

Self-tapping wood screws , and other screws, really make a big difference in the outcomes of any house project. These basic products can be the difference between a finished project that can last for a lot of years and one which may fall apart the first time you use it. Everyone has made compromises when performing project work. This is typically due to the inconvenience of having to run to the store for the little and seemingly insignificant part that simply does not appear to be worth the effort to make the trip. If you consider arrogance in your venture, you may want to rethink if that is true. If it seriously did not make a difference you may not have the multitude of options to choose from. Wood screws come in dozens of lengths and have certain characteristics for particular uses.

One leading example of a specialty wood screw is for outside decking. Deck screws are specially coated to be rust-resistant. Doing so can help decrease the chance of unpleasant rust marks from developing on your outdoor patio stretch. The rust resistant covering additionally keeps the screw from becoming deteriorated by weather conditions. Because they are exposed to the outdoors, and in the case of the outdoor patio, are especially vulnerable to the elements. This is simply because the fasteners are employed on a flat surface that can pool water in the fastener holes. A failure can result should the fastener rust through. The resulting loose decking could additionally cause a safety hazard and homeowner liability. The enzymes and chemical substances employed in treated timber can be hard on the screw as well. The small expense in employing the right screws pales in comparability to the doable consequences. Recall, the covering is merely corrosion proof so to treat the outdoor patio face as needed to hold each the wood and fasteners in good shape.

Wood screws have come a long way in their overall performance and the know-how these folks employ. This technological innovation allows for greater, and lengthier long lasting benefits with your home projects. This translates into much better wanting tasks using an expert quality. One recent development in of a wood screw is the use of different drive heads. The most popular are still the Phillips head screws. The cross shaped drive head provides safe contact in between the driver and the screw. They also permit for a standard of connection offering the user the ability to do the job on different planes while taking care of control of the fastener. The sq disk will take doing so connection separating app and screw and creates a contact point which not only supply much better grip during the drive, but attaches so snugly that you can do the job upside straight down or sideways without losing contact using the drive head. The regular fastener head has its uses, but for comfort the sq drive and Phillips head offer added control.

The design of a wood screw is being founded on the particular characteristics of how wood works using the fastener. If you evaluate a metal screw to a wood screw you will see most differences. The wood screw is tapered producing the connection more safe. A metal screw does not possess this taper, and because of doing so, must not be employed in wood applications. The screw can have a propensity to again from the hole leading to the joint to fail. Wood screws usually do not possess threads that extend all the way to the screw head. This feature helps keep the fastener firmly in place. The best advice is if you do have a wood venture, use self-tapping wood screws for an ideal result.

Not only can be used in decks but also can be used in docks, fences, spas, Gazebos, siding and other outdoor applications. Now, if you are wondering as to how these fasteners can enhance the quality of your furniture in any way, here are the points that prove its superiority.

* Decking screws can last for a long time when they have special corrosive resisting coatings.

Very popular coatings are ceramic which offer 500 hours, 1000 hours and up to 1200 hours salt spray testing. This gives protection from rain and other types of elements which can cause rust in most other types of plated screws. The ceramic coating also prevents streaking or staining the lumber. They come colored coded for red, green and tan lumber.

They present a nice clean look to the surface since they are made with nibs built under the head so that they will countersink themselves and will be flush with the wood. They are specifically made with a lot of convenience to work with such as the Type 17 point which will allow the excess wood to escape and thus prevent the wood from splitting while the screw is being installed. After they are drilled in, there is no bulge on the exterior surface.

They normally come readily available in either phillips or square drive, square drive being the most well-liked because the square bits are the simplest to use as they help avert slipping.

The simple fact that they are self tapping screws they will also save you time and cash considering they will tap their own threads. As long as you have good building materials, your self-tapping deck screws will hold your structure together with ease.

Let All Points Fasteners Help You Build Reliable Decks and More

All Points Fasteners offers quality components for commercial and residential construction work. With our help, you and your team can complete projects fast while maintaining a reputation for high-quality work. When you partner with us, we ensure you receive excellent customer service, live representative chat and timely shipping.

All Points Fasteners is owned and operated in America, and we provide domestic quality at an imported price. To learn more, feel free to contact us online or call us at 800.483.6354.

How to Install Gutter Screws | What’s the Difference & What to Use

How to Install Gutter Screws

Gutters are crucial features on any home, which means they need to be secured and well-maintained. Without a strong gutter system, your home can succumb to roof damage, siding damage and erosion issues around the foundation. Gutter nails have been a popular method for attaching gutters, but gutter screws offer certain advantages that can create a better overall system.

What Are Gutter Screws?

Gutter screws typically have an indented head with six flat sides and a washer that sits underneath the head. The washer provides a flat bearing surface, which reduces the risk of crushing the mating surface. When you attach gutters to your house using gutter screws, the screw’s large bearing area prevents your gutters from becoming dented or cracked during installation.

Gutter downspout screws are a type of self-piercing screw. They have a threaded shaft that tapers down to a sharp point, which creates a hole as you drive the screw into the substrate. Because they create their own holes, gutter screws eliminate the need for pre-drilling, making installation faster.

Gutter screws can penetrate and cut through hanging gutter downspouts quickly and easily. With one thread that pierces the material and a second thread that forms around the tip, downspout screws provide more efficient and reliable results.

Browse Gutter Screw Options

Differences in Gutter Nails vs. Screws

The primary difference between gutter nails and screws is that the latter produces a much better hold. Nails are affordable and easy to install, but they’re also prone to gradual slippage as gutters endure repeated water flow.

A gutter nail is long and thin, which means it is less sturdy than a gutter screw and less likely to hold its position. When they come loose, the gutters can hang away from the roof, which creates openings for the rainfall to leak past. This occurrence is what can cause the issues mentioned above.

Screws, with their durable threads and construction, will maintain their hold longer and withstand environmental factors thanks to their corrosion-resistance qualities.

What Screws to Use for Gutters and Downspouts

For a tighter hold, you’ll find that most gutter and downspout screws utilize a hex head, which can be slotted or unslotted to allow for flathead screwdriver access. Typically, you’ll need longer hardware to replace nails appropriately, but the size will vary depending on your gutter’s specifications.

Considering the material of your gutter — which is typically made of steel, aluminum and copper — you can find various finishes to match it. All Points Fasteners carries copper-plated screws, as well as ceramic coatings that boast excellent environmental resistance.

How to Install Your Gutter Screws

Now that you understand the importance of gutter screws and have an idea of which kind you’ll use, follow these four steps to install them.

1. Inspect Your Gutters

If you plan on replacing your gutter nails, you’ll first need to climb up and count the number of nails used, so you can acquire the right amount of screws. You also need to check the state and size of the ferrules, which are the cylindrical objects that house the nail stems.

The screws and ferrules must work together well or else you will not create a secure hold.

2. Acquire the Right Hardware

Take samples of your nails and ferrules, as well as information about your gutters, to a local hardware store. You could also send pictures and specs of the samples to an online customer service representative if you want to purchase the parts online. The workers should give you advice and point you in the right direction.

3. Tear Out the Nails

Carefully remove the nails to avoid losing the parts in your yard or damaging the roof and gutter. A claw hammer is the usually the easiest method for performing this task.

4. Begin Screw Installation

Insert the screw into the existing hole in the gutter face, and then the ferrule over it. It’s critical that you do not drill the screw into the existing nail hole. Instead, position the tip just above the preexisting hole and then force it into the fascia (roof). Most screws have self-tapping bits, so you don’t need a separate part to create a pilot hole.

Do not overtighten the screws, as that can damage the gutters and decrease their overall strength.

Find Your Gutter Screws at All Points Fasteners

Whether you are working on a do-it-yourself (DIY) gutter repair or tackling a job for a client, you need gutters with exceptional durability that will stand the test of time. That is why we offer the toughest gutter downspout screws to meet the high-quality standards you need to ensure the best gutter installation work. Our gutter screws are available in many different sizes and finishes, meaning there’s a solution for all your gutter needs.

The dedicated experts at All Points Fasteners will assist you in finding the right gutter screws for your job. We offer free samples, monthly deals and custom requests to provide the flexibility you’ll struggle to find elsewhere. Browse our online inventory today, or chat with us to ask any questions you might have.

Installing Drywall Anchors – Tips & Tricks

How to Install Drywall Anchors

When hanging artwork, shelves, TVs or other heavier items on hollow walls, you can drastically increase their security by installing wall anchors.
Anchors reduce the chance of the hung materials becoming too heavy for the screw to bear, and they also help to cut down the chances of damaging the surrounding wall. Once you sort out the details, installing drywall anchors and screws is an easy task anyone can accomplish with the appropriate tools.

What Types of Drywall Anchors Can You Choose From?
Before drilling headfirst into your wall, you’ll need to analyze the different types of drywall anchors to determine the best fit for your situation.
Some popular models include:

  • Hollow Wall Anchor: Also called “Molly” anchors, hollow wall anchors will often see use in medium-duty applications. They’re formed using a machine screw that’s been threaded through a slotted metal sleeve. Tightening the screw will cause the sleeve to expand, and its spread will rest against the inside of the wall to disperse the screw’s load. These anchors can usually hold around 50 pounds in 1/2-inch drywall.
  •  Toggle Bolts: “Butterfly” anchors are a classic type, and they’re arguably the strongest type of drywall anchors. The metal sleeves utilize two spring-loaded wings that open inside the wall. You need to fold back the wings and then insert the unit into the wall, and it will then spread back out to create a sturdy hold. Different models give you different holding capacities. Slender bolts can hold up to 30 pounds, while thicker iterations can hold more than 50.
  •  Plastic Screw Anchors: You’ll most often see plastic anchors for light-to-medium usage, making them exceedingly common. Its cost-efficient hardware that gradually expands as you thread the screw.

Tips for Installing Drywall Anchors

Once you’ve decided what type of drywall anchor you’re using, you’re ready to get to work. Here are five tips to consider when going through the process.

1. Find the Right Spot

As opposed to other mounting jobs, you can avoid using studs and instead pick anywhere that you feel comfortable. If you’re hanging multiple items, measure out the distances accurately to avoid overcrowding. Mark the desired spots with a pencil, then break out your drill.

2. Use an Appropriately Sized Drill Bit

Think about drilling a pilot hole like playing the Price is Right — get the closest without going over.

Your drill bit should nearly mirror the diameter of the anchor, but try to keep it a tad smaller. That slight size disparity creates a better hold when compared to larger holes, which will be too loose for the anchor to grasp. If you’re feeling weary about the process, start at a reasonably small drill bit size, test the fit and move up to the next size until you find your proper match.

3. Prepare the Screw and Anchor

If you’re using toggle bolts or hollow wall anchors, begin threading the screw in before installing them to give it a good headstart.

4. Secure the Anchor

You can then firmly press the wall anchor into the wall. For toggle bolts, you should hear the wings snap into place. When installing plastic anchors or molly anchors you should be able to slide them all the way in without any difficulties. If your plastic anchors need a push, you can lightly tap them with a hammer to get them flush with the wall. Be careful not to swing too hard, as you could damage the wall.

5. Drill the Screws

You can then drill the screws into place. Approach the screws from a 90-degree angle to ensure they go in straight, and drill slowly to prevent stipping the unit. The screw head should sit flush with the anchor head.

Find Your Drywall Anchors and Screws at All Points Fasteners

Now that you know how to install drywall anchors and screws, you can procure the best hardware for the job at All Points Fasteners. We offer free samples, monthly deals and custom requests to create a stress-free experience. Browse our different types of drywall anchors today and contact us to ask any questions you might have.

Four Common Materials Screws Are Made of and Which to Use

Screws are vital to the success of many different projects, whether you’re a do-it-yourself enthusiast or a service industry professional. However, you should consider some critical areas before you invest in screws for your next job. In this guide, we will answer all of your questions about screws:

  • Does it matter how screws are made?
  • What are screws made of?
  • What does the coating on screws do?
  • How do I decide what screw to use?

All Points Fasteners has the strongest screws and fasteners you need for your projects. Contact us today to learn more.

How Are Screws Made?

There are two different manufacturing processes for making screws. Most screws are made with the thread rolling method. Machining is used to make small or specialized screws that cannot be made by thread rolling.

The first step in making a screw with the thread rolling method is called “cold heading.” A wire is fed into a machine to straighten it, then cut it to length. The machine then cuts the head into the desired shape.

There are three techniques that can be used to cut the blank screw to give it threading:

  • Reciprocating die: There are two flat dies — one is stationary, and the other moves back and forth. The screw is rolled between the two dies.
  • Centerless cylindrical die: The screw is rolled between two or three round dies to create the thread.
  • Planetary rotary die: As the screw is held stationary, several die-cutting machines spin it around.

 Between these two screw manufacturing processes, thread rolling is better. The screws are more durable and high quality, avoiding weaknesses in the metal. The screw threads are placed precisely as well, so all screws are the same.

What Are Screws Made Of?

Screws can be made from all sorts of materials, yet there are some that are more popular than the others. The four most common screw materials are:

  • Steel: This is by far the most common material used for manufacturing screws, and there’s a simple explanation for why — steel is cheap. The only drawback to steel is that it is weaker than some of the other options on this list.
  • Copper: Copper screws are good for fighting against corrosion. If a screw is going to be exposed to the elements, copper helps to ensure the screw performs durably over the long-term.
  • Aluminum: Aluminum isn’t as durable as other materials, but it does have one thing going for it — its weight. Aluminum is just about the lightest weight fastener you can find.
  • Titanium: When you need a blend of strength and lightness, go with titanium. You’ll often pay a premium for titanium screws, but that extra cost pays off big time when you need a fastener that is robust but doesn’t weigh much.

What About Coatings?

Screws are often coated to make them even better by giving them desirable qualities. Screw coatings open up a vast number of possibilities when you’re seeking the right fastener for a specific situation. For example, screws can be coated in copper, ceramic, zinc and other materials, which can provide extra strength, extra protection against corrosion or even an aesthetic quality that might otherwise be missing.

For example, a zinc-plated steel screw will better fight corrosion than a steel screw on its own. Likewise, a copper-plated screw may look more attractive in a prominent place than a steel screw would.

Which Screw Should I Use?

No two kinds of screws are alike. Before you buy screws for your next project, consider these points to make sure you are getting the right kind.

First, identify what materials you are screwing into. Different kinds of screws are made to fasten different materials. For example, the strongest wood screws are made for joining two pieces of wood. Once you’ve determined the material, measure its thickness. You’ll want to get a screw that is long enough to pass through the material and at least halfway into the next for a secure grip.

The next consideration is material. This decision will be based on where you plan to use the screw — indoors or outdoors. For an indoor project, you may be able to use a less expensive screw that looks pleasing if it will be visible. Outdoor projects need certain kinds of screws since they will be exposed to temperature changes and moisture. Then, consider the coating options to gain even more ideal qualities.

Find High-Quality Screws at All Points Fasteners

Now that you know everything you need to know about screws, it’s time to find the perfect screws for your next job. Are you ready to secure high-quality materials for your next job? Find them in our selection at All Points Fasteners.

We pride ourselves on offering a vast and varied selection of screws made of different materials that match particular specifications and feature various types of coatings. When you’re looking for something specific for a unique job at hand, we have the solution. If we happen to not have the screw you need, we’ll find it for you.

In addition to our wide selection, you’ll find competitive prices, fast shipping and outstanding customer service when you choose All Points Fasteners. We are dedicated to making sure you get exactly what you need as quickly as possible.

Browse our inventory of different screws today, and to learn more about our fasteners,  contact our team with any questions you have. Complete our contact form or call us at 800-483-6354.

 

What Makes a Stronger Zip Screw | Design Features to Consider

Zip Screws: What Makes a Stronger Zip Screw?

We, at All Points, believe that whether you call them Sheet Metal Screws, Self-Piercing, Self-Tapping or Speed Point, whether you are using them for HVAC, Gutter or Siding, one thing is certain, time is money and you can’t waste either. I’m sure there’s nothing more frustrating than balancing on a high pitched roof and having to deal with snapping, misaligned screws. Nothing worse than doing something twice.

Another problem you come across is bombarded with the overwhelming amount of screws to choose from. Well hopefully, we can shed a little light on some choices that are out there.


Here are some things to consider:

Hex Washer Heads: Our Hex Washer Head Screws are very popular in the industry. The Hex Head is desired because of its strength and stability. An important thing to consider is the height of the Hex Head. The higher the Hex Head, the more stable the screw. The drill chuck has a broader surface to use to reduce the tension placed on the head of the screw. Since the grip is more secure, there is a much lower chance of stripping the screw head. Which I’m sure you know the nightmare trying to remove a stripped screw head can be. In addition with a high performance hex head will help secure the chuck which will help stabilize the drilling and prevent “wobbling”.

Fillet: This feature strengthens the screw without increasing the size of the screw shaft.

Dacroment Salt Spray: This is a treatment that help to slow the natural oxidation of the metal. This is such a fantastic feature, especially since the forecasts are pointing to another icy, wet winter though out the entire U.S and a good part of Canada. (Credit to www.farmersalmanac.com)

Another fact to keep in mind is the type of screw you are looking for. Again, it will save time and money choose the right screw for the right job. For example, a #10 HWH Screw and a #8 HWH Screw will both work for Gutter Instillation, however, with the wood used in current construction projects have more knots than wood from twenty years ago. The #10 HWH has a thicker shaft and the threads are closer together, which slows the screw rotation. The slower rotation causes the screw to self-drill at a more controlled speed. This allows it to drill through knottier, denser wood, where as a #8 HWH has a thinner screw shaft and closer drill threads which increases the chance of snapping and stripping if used for the wrong application.

Our last suggestion to consider is the material the screw is made of. There are a few to choose from. First there is the Stainless Steel/Copper Plated Screw. This screw works really well with Copper Gutters. This screw is made with a 4/10 gauge steel allows this screw to be used with a magnetized drill chuck.

Another type of screw that works well with Metal Roofs, are Copper Screws. These screw more closely match the Copper Roof. They are made with a 18-8 gauge metal which means there is a higher percentage of copper. This means they are not magnetic, but they better match the natural patina of the copper roof over time.

Stainless Steel screw are another great option. Not only are they strong and durable, but they can be easily used with a magnetized drill chuck. They can be painted to match a lot of the popular colors of the newest styles of today’s metal roofs. Its durability is also a great option for the tiny house trends that becoming a creative option of mobile living.

Hopefully you have found this information informative and useful. With the trends of construction constantly changing, it’s hard to know what is out there. Good thing here at All Points, we are here to answer any questions you may have.

Learn More About Gutter Zip Screws with Our Product Primer

Gutter Zip Screws – Our New Primer!

Gutter zip screws primer. We are proud to present the third in our series of product primers.

Gutter screws. They’re not what they were during the 80’s or 90’s. Like everything else, time has evolved from what used to be a standard 8 x 1 1/2 hex washer needlepoint zip screws to our beefy 10 x 1 1/2 hex washer head needlepoint zip screws with a high profile 1/4″ hex head and a fillet underneath the head to give it extra strength. One nice feature of this screw is that even though it has a #10 shank it has a 1/4 hex head which is standard with a #8 screw. Since the gutter and siding industry uses #8 screws, the #8 style head was used on this screw so that the installers wouldn’t have to constantly be changing the chucks in their drills from 1/4 inch to 5/16 inch magnetic drivers. In addition, there is a high profile head on the screws so that they will stay in the drivers and not fall out.

Another option for zip screws used in siding and gutters, is the choice to have a ceramic coating, anywhere from 500 to 1200 salt spray hours of testing,

Screws with this Dacromet® coating are perfect for areas that are exposed to moisture and wet weather. They are also available with the heads painted to match popular siding colors.

For copper gutters, there are many more options available than what was in the past. Stainless steel zip screws, magnetic and non-magnetic, and copper plated stainless zip screws match the copper gutters.

So many more choices for gutter screws!