Color & Type Options for Self-Tapping Zip Screws

Self-Tapping Zip Screws – Oodles of Options!

Zip screws, aka needle point screws, have self-piercing points and twin-fast threads that are perfect for screwing through light gauge metal.
We suggest them for 30 gauge down to 24. Everyone is familiar with the versions that are zinc plated. They are very popular with the HVAC industry for round and square duct work. These are generally used for interior projects where rust isn’t a major concern.
Another version of the zip screw, needle point screw, is one that is designed for the gutter industry. With a high profile 1/4″ hex head on a #10 shank, rather than the normal 5/16 hex chuck. It also features a fillet underneath the head for extra strength

If additional rust resistance is required due to weather or application, ceramic coated zip screws and stainless zip screws are available.

In addition to 1000 hour salt spray protection, the heads of these screws are also frequently painted to match siding, gutters or metal roofs!

Bonded Neoprene washers can be fitted for metal roofs.

Zip screws with the Type 17 point, or auger point, helps the screws to start easier. The ‘cut out’ at the point of the screw allows the displaced wood to escape and, therefore, keeps the wood from splitting. The high/low threads contribute to stronger fastening and greater resistance to pull out.
Most zip screws are simply zinc plated, however, for areas where rust might be a concern, there are stainless steel needle point screws available. They are available in magnetic (410 stainless) and non-magnetic (18-8 stainless). The benefit of 18-8 stainless is that here is no carbon steel so there is no surface rust at all, however, that means the screws will not be magnetic. The 410 stainless zip screws will be magnetic, however, overtime, some surface rust will become apparent. We have gone one step further to protect from surface rust. Our 410 stainless screws also have a ceramic coating for additional protection.

And finally, there are zip screws with ceramic coated with 500 to 1000 salt spray tested plating. These are also available with their heads painted to match gutters or metal roofing.

Is There a New Screw Design Out There for iPhones?

IPHONE New Screws

I’ve always had a secret desire to design some new, never been thought of before zip screw or tek screw so I could be the first to market it to an industry just waiting for a new and better widget!

So, how quickly do you think it’s going to take for some smart entrepreneur will take this from “idea” to “ready for distribution”? Who was it that said “whatever man can conceive, he can achieve”?

As reported in The Register –

Designer Punked Fanbois With Asymmetric Screw
By Richard Chirgwin

For a little while, the Apple press fell over itself to analyze the import of a screw that was reportedly going to lock customers and repairers out of the next iPhone forever. The source of the story has now ‘fessed up that to the hoax that set the wires a-buzz.

Swedish design house Day4 has posted its account of events here. Deciding to test peoples’ gullibility – and the speed with which disinformation could be spread – Lukasz Lindell and his colleagues created an imaginary “asymmetric screw” in a CAD package, grabbed the image, and posted it to Reddit with a fake message saying the pic demonstrated that Apple is “even creating their own screws.” (Day4’s fake screw design)

The result was pick-up by Cult of Mac, and from there it spread like wildfire, Lindell writes:

However, perhaps more interesting than the media pickup – as Lindell notes, the story was treated as a rumour rather than a fact (and Cult of Mac has now noted the hoax without complaint) – was an outcome that falls into “social science” research.

Lindell writes: “With each step further away from the source the perception that this would be true increased. On Reddit, where the original entry was made we see it as a 0 mode, the image was posted, nothing more or less.” However, by the time the story was being discussed and commentated on various blogs and social media outlets, “all doubt is gone”.

He even goes so far as to apologize to anyone who took the story as truth: “we just want to say sorry to you who feel cheated”.


It may have all been a joke, or a experiment of sorts, to see how fast a rumor could spread, but no doubt some smart, far thinking, entrepreneur will figure out a way how to manufacture and market this screw in the near future. How many now common household items actually began as mistakes and it was suddenly realized that they worked wonderfully for applications they were never intended to be used. Life changing inventions….all by accident and not by design.

How about….?

The Slinky

Inventor: Richard Jones
What he was trying to make: A meter designed to monitor power on naval battleships

How he invented: Richard Jones was working with tension springs when one of them fell on the floor. The spring kept bouncing after it hit the ground and the slinky was invented.

Or maybe…..?

Chocolate-Chip Cookies

Inventor: Ruth Wakefield, Owner of the Toll House Inn

What she was trying to make: Regular chocolate cookies

How was it created? While she was mixing up a batch of cookie dough, Ruth Wakefield found out she was almost out of baker’s chocolate. In order to stretch out what little chocolate she had, she broke the sweetened chocolate into small, little pieces and mixed them to the cookie dough expecting them to melt, making her regular chocolate cookies, but they did not and there ya go!

Or, how about..?

Microwave ovens

Inventor: Percy Spencer, engineer at Raytheon Corp
What he was attempting to make: The engineer was conducting a radar related research project with a new vacuum tube

How it was created: when the candy bar in his pocket began to melt during his experiments, he then put popcorn into the machine. And when it started popping, he realized he had a incredible new invention!


Well, I may not have invented it but there definitely are some better tek screws available now than was when I first got started selling screws and All Points Fasteners has them available for sale! There are #4 and #5 tek points available to penetrate thicker metals without snapping the heads off. Tek screws make of non-magnetic stainless steel so they will not rust but with steel tek screws points so that they can drill through metals easier than stainless steel tek screw points which are much softer.

We also have tek screws which are stainless steel but ALSO ceramic coated with 1000 hour salt spray testing for even more protection from rusting.

Finding the Self-Tapping Screw You Need Based on Description!

It’s Not So Difficult Ordering Self-Tapping Screws!

So you picked a self-tapping screw off a job site and it was just what you have been looking for but it didn’t come in a box that was labeled – it was just sitting there on the floor. What do you do? How can you ask for something when you’re not really sure what to ask for? The nice thing is that it isn’t so difficult if you know what dimensions to measure when you are asking your fastener sales representative to help you.

Start describing and measuring from the top of the zip screw or tek screws (check this out) and then head down to the bottom.

First describe the head. Is it a…?

There are other style heads available but these are the most common head styles that you should know. Once you can identify the head style that you are looking for, it makes things much easier.

To identify the shank size of the screw, it’s much easier if your screw is a hex head. When considering the shank size, think dress size. The smaller the number, the thinner the shank. The bigger the number, the thicker the shank.

The standard for the industry is:

• 1/4″ Hex Head = #6 or #7 or #8 shank size
• 5/16″ Hex Head = #10 or #12 shank size
• 3/8″ Hex Head = #14 shank size


Of course there always have to be exceptions just to keep things interesting.
In our case, we have needlepoint screws (aka zip screws) developed especially for the gutter industry with have high profile 1/4″ hex head but #10 washers and #10 body shanks. In the 70’s and 80’s, standard #8 screws worked fine for the gutter industry but when the quality of the wood used for homes changed, it was necessary to increase the thickness of the shanks so that the screws wouldn’t snap when hitting knots in the wood. We also added a filet underneath the head to give the screw a little extra strength.

Next, there is TPI or threads per inch to consider. As a rule of thumb, the less threads per inch, the screw is intended to be used in wood. The more TPI, the screw is meant for metal or metal studs. These are sometimes called out as ‘coarse threaded’ or ‘fine threaded’ screws. If you try and use a coarse threaded screw in metal studs or hard woods, the quality of the screw can’t really be blamed when it snaps although that happens all the time. It is simply misapplication and the more you know what screws were made for what applications, the less problems you will have when using your screws.


Now we get to the points of the screws.

Does the point look like a pencil point?

Does the point look like a drill bit tip?

There are other type points like Type 17’s used with woods and others but the two listed above are the most common.


And lastly, you should remember to state the plating that you need. Zinc plating is most common with under normal situations will last you about two years on average. Hot dipped galvanized is generally five years. But these are old school type plating. We have started stocking Dacronized®, ceramic type plating, which we normally have stocked in 500, 1000 and 1200 hour salt spray tested. They give you extra protection and even are available with the heads painted as well to match exterior applications.

When you are looking at a label on a box, the screws will generally be labeled something like “8-18×1 HWH SDS Z/P”. This would translate to #8
shank, 18 TPI by 1 inch long, hex washer head, self drilling screw (tek type point) zinc plated.

This is not everything that there is to know about self-tapping screws, zip screws and tek screws included, but it will give you a good baseline to start!

Designer Screws Other Than Zip & Tek Screws

Not Just Zip Screws and Tek Screws!

Having been in the fastener industry for contractors since 1986 selling zip screws and tek screws you would think there would be nothing new to learn. Wrong! Although we specialize in screws mainly used by the Heating and Air Conditioning and Gutter industries , more and more I am hearing from OEM’S or engineers who are desperately looking for screws that don’t exist. They needs head diameter’s that are smaller so that they will fit in between narrow grooves, points that will penetrate hard plastic, then go through 30 gauge steel and then tap into stucco then into wood. And they are being used outdoors in the snow but should be rust proof but not as expensive as stainless steel. And all in the same screw! It’s a wonder I have a hair left on my head!

In years past, designer screws were a source of frustration for me because one of my contractors would pick up a screw that he really liked on a job site and then want me to locate a source for them. After many hours, maybe days, of diligent searching, I would finally find out that someone like a major hotel chain had the screws made especially for them to install the cabinets in their hotels and getting the same screws with the same dimensions was never going to happen.

Well the good news is that some manufacturers have changed their willingness to do smaller orders so that the chance of having these ‘designer screws’ manufactured is much higher now than it was in the past. Within recent months, we have been successful in procuring parts that in the past would have been impossible to supply. Of course, there are still minimums to be met but instead of having to order containers of screws in order to get the manufacturers interested, we can get away with a pallet or two. Good news for some but still not low enough for others.

Still, there are many more options available to choose from than there were 20 years ago, starting with coatings to keep screws from rusting as quickly. Take a look at our ceramic coated zip screws, available which with painted heads as well. These parts work great in areas where weather conditions are moist. We will soon be supplying needlepoint screws which are stainless steel as well as ceramic coated which will bring increased rust resistance.

Self-tapping Ceramic Coated Zip Screws

Self-tapping Ceramic Coated Zip Screws

What are ceramic coated zip screws? Everybody is used to seeing common self-tapping needlepoint screws, also known as zip screws, which are plated zinc. These screws are primarily manufactured for inside installations since zinc plating is not really rust resistant enough for outdoor use. Zinc plating is usually available in three colors – white zinc (the most popular), blue zinc (very attractive for screws that are exposed) and yellow zinc (very popular plating for cabinet installers).

Another familiar variation to zip screws are standard zinc plated with the heads of the screws painted to match the gutters or siding.

A much less well known option is the ceramic coated needlepoint screws. Other names used for ceramic coating is Ruspert and Dacromet coatings. These ceramic coated zip screws offer more resistance to rust. The entire screw is coated, including the shank, with a method which can safeguard them with a 500 hour or 1000 hour salt spray tested product. These same screws can be bought with the heads color painted as well. This offers additional protection as well as matching the color scheme of gutters and siding. They are not as rust resistant as, say, stainless steel self-piercing screws, but they do very well in applications that need a little more resistance to rust.

MATERIAL /FINISH: CERAMIC COATED CARBON STEEL (1000 HOUR SALT SPRAY TESTED)

The ceramic coating is a non-organic, tri-layered ceramic surface coating developed to attain the best possible performance in the numerous pollutive and atmospheric conditions that cause corrosion. The 1st layer: a metallic zinc layer, the 2nd layer: a high-grade anti-corrosion chemical conversion film, and the 3rd top layer: a baked ceramic top coating. The distinguishing feature of the silver ceramic coating is the tight joining of the baked ceramic top coating and the chemical conversion film thanks to the cross-linking effect. These layers are bonded together with the metallic zinc layer through chemical reac tions, and this unique method of combining layers results in a rigid and dense combination of the coating films. The coating does not attribute its anti-corrosion properties to merely a single material, but the synergy of these three layers, which combined have superb rust proof qualities.

Compatible with metal coated and painted surfaces, fasteners coated with silver ceramic are resistant to acid and alkaline attack, galvanic corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement.

These fasteners conform to corrosive gas test standard (Kesternich) DIN50018 and give a Salt Spray Fog test to exceed (JISZ2731) 1000 Hours. (ASTM B117)

Reamer Teks – Screws Best Kept Secret!

Reamer Teks – Screws Best Kept Secret!

There are several different types of self-tapping, self-drilling screws, commonly known as tek screws. Each serves its own purpose and deciding on the proper part for the job is critical in order for the screw to perform correctly.

One relatively unknown tek screw is the reamer tek. The reamer tek screw is the ultimate wood-to-steel fastener. The reamer tek screw typically has a flat head using a Philips drive. There are also ‘wings’ right above the drill bit tip. Reamer tek screws have been developed for the function of going through wood into steel. The screws are manufactured with wings which ream out the wood to prevent early thread engagement into the timber prior to the drill point drilling in the metal. The wings are made to snap-off when they connect with steel that is 16 gauge (.060″) or thicker. These fasteners are not produced for use in steel thinner than 16 gauge. The fasteners are built with finer threads, typically 16 to 24 threads per inch, so that the drill bit can get a chance to drill in the thicker metals without snapping. There is additionally a slot in the shank that carries the metal shavings from the screw’s drill motion and stops them from interfering using the fastener threads as they tap into metal. There are a lot of uses for this little known fastener such as wood fencing, truck beds, trailer decks, horse trailers, snowmobile trailers, 4 wheeler trailers and more. These reamer tek screws will include the choice of whether #3, #4 or #5 tek screw points.

An additional choice will be what material will be used in manufacturing. Usually, these are made with normal carbon steel, but for applications requiring resistance to corrosion, similar to being utilized on wood docks close to water, there are stainless steel reamer tek screws available that are coated for additional rust resistance for use with ACQ lumber. For the ultimate rust resistance, there are bi-metal reamer tek screws where the body of the screw is completely non magnetic stainless but the point is made of hardened carbon steel. This allow the bit tip to do all the hard work but the body remains completely rust free and non corrosive. The downside is that they are costly but, for some, very worth the price!

Self-Tapping Deck Screws – Best For The Job!

Self-Tapping Deck Screws – Best For The Job!

Self-tapping screws are the least thought about component when people think of buildings, furniture, cars, bikes or just about anything else you can name. But really, when you think of it, you can’t throw a rock without hitting something put together with screws. Since the job of the screw is to keep things together, quality for this little thought of component is more important than people usually think.

One of the lesser known but not long ago developed model of screws is the decking screw. They are superior in quality, last for a long time and keep wood [Self tapping deck screws] unaffected from discolorization for a long time. They not only can be used in decks but also can be used in docks, fences, spas, Gazebos, siding and other outdoor applications. Now, if you are wondering as to how these fasteners can enhance the quality of your furniture in any way, here are the points that prove its superiority.

* Decking screws can last for a long time when they have special corrosive resisting coatings.

Very popular coatings are ceramic which offer 500 hours, 1000 hours and up to 1200 hours salt spray testing. This gives protection from rain and other types of elements which can cause rust in most other types of plated screws. The ceramic coating also prevents streaking or staining the lumber. They come colored coded for red, green and tan lumber.

They present a nice clean look to the surface since they are made with nibs built under the head so that they will countersink themselves and will be flush with the wood. They are specifically made with a lot of convenience to work with such as the Type 17 point which will allow the excess wood to escape and thus prevent the wood from splitting while the screw is being installed. After they are drilled in, there is no bulge on the exterior surface.

They normally come readily available in either phillips or square drive, square drive being the most well-liked because the square bits are the simplest to use as they help avert slipping.

The simple fact that they are self tapping screws they will also save you time and cash considering they will tap their own threads.

Zip Screws for Siding

Zip Screws for Siding

A remodeled home may possibly be constructed of the best internal materials, and might have the safest and most up-to-date wiring and plumbing. But, if the exterior doesn’t look good, many possible consumers will routinely reject it. Amongst other factors, climate and environment can make siding replacement necessary over time. When taking into consideration siding, what are the ideal products for the job, which include the materials used in the zip screws used to install?

There really is no solitary answer that suits all construction. The background of siding is lengthy, and products have become popular and then declined in favor. The most prevalent variety today is vinyl, a plastic compound first found in 1872. It became commercially viable in the 1930s, and was widely used in home construction after the 1960s. It has retained much of its popularity since that time, and vinyl used for this function consumes a big percentage of production.

Vinyl siding these days generally covers up older products such as wood. Wood was the predominant choice for years. When available, wood is attractive, occurs naturally, doesn’t require a chemical processing plant, and adds charm and warmth to a home. It is still a very popular form of siding, but environmental and manufacturing issues have made it less economically possible for many people. Wood must be repainted just about every few years, and damp climates can cause it to deteriorate over time.

Through the 1950s, a lot of homeowners began to cover their home’s wooden exteriors with asbestos, prior to the acknowledgement of asbestos’ inherent health hazards. This kind of siding was manufactured until the 1970s, and there are still homes that were originally covered with this form of material. Its main advantage was fire and insect resistance, but as soon as other products became obtainable, asbestos use was largely deserted.

Another economical siding alternative was asphalt. This low cost building material was one of the least attractive options available, and consisted of a base sheet covered with a thick, gooey black mixture that contains crushed rock. This material was very weather resistant, and could be disguised to look like other materials such as brick. After an initial boom during the post World War II years, the use of asphalt was eclipsed by aluminum.

Aluminum siding was also a post-war phenomenon of the second half of the 20th century. It is lightweight, relatively easy to install, and easily covers worn and unattractive older exteriors with a minimum of effort. Aluminum rarely needs repainting, won’t rust, and in general has been considered a much more viable and permanent solution to external home needs. The biggest disadvantage with aluminum is production. creating aluminum from bauxite is energy-intensive and can be environmentally degrading. This metal is easily dented, and won’t bounce back into shape.

Hardboard, a material composite of wood chips and epoxy resin, was touted as a substitute, but there were really serious issues with moisture retention. Because of those issues, vinyl regained the lead in siding popularity.many of the difficulties associated with vinyl have been overcome, allowing it to become the dominant material used today. It competes directly with aluminum. Vinyl won’t dent, is moisture resistant, won’t snap in subzero temperatures, doesn’t need grounding, won’t erode, and is more inexpensive during construction.

Deciding on the correct material for siding installation means finding the right material appropriate to the style of construction (zip screws or tek screws, where are self-tapping, included) and overall budget. For example, using vinyl to cover the exterior of a stately Victorian home would be a mismatch, and would simply not look right. On the other hand, using expensive wood siding on a tract home may not be the most practical solution, either. Avery good idea is to gather samples before deciding on alternative material, and to take a look at other homes in the neighborhood to see what has worked best. Once the choices are narrowed, then it is time to start working out the details of construction with the contractor of your choice.