Four Common Materials Screws Are Made of and Which to Use

Screws are vital to the success of many different projects, whether you’re a do-it-yourself enthusiast or a service industry professional. However, you should consider some critical areas before you invest in screws for your next job. In this guide, we will answer all of your questions about screws:

  • Does it matter how screws are made?
  • What are screws made of?
  • What does the coating on screws do?
  • How do I decide what screw to use?

All Points Fasteners has the strongest screws and fasteners you need for your projects. Contact us today to learn more.

How Are Screws Made?

There are two different manufacturing processes for making screws. Most screws are made with the thread rolling method. Machining is used to make small or specialized screws that cannot be made by thread rolling.

The first step in making a screw with the thread rolling method is called “cold heading.” A wire is fed into a machine to straighten it, then cut it to length. The machine then cuts the head into the desired shape.

There are three techniques that can be used to cut the blank screw to give it threading:

  • Reciprocating die: There are two flat dies — one is stationary, and the other moves back and forth. The screw is rolled between the two dies.
  • Centerless cylindrical die: The screw is rolled between two or three round dies to create the thread.
  • Planetary rotary die: As the screw is held stationary, several die-cutting machines spin it around.

 Between these two screw manufacturing processes, thread rolling is better. The screws are more durable and high quality, avoiding weaknesses in the metal. The screw threads are placed precisely as well, so all screws are the same.

What Are Screws Made Of?

Screws can be made from all sorts of materials, yet there are some that are more popular than the others. The four most common screw materials are:

  • Steel: This is by far the most common material used for manufacturing screws, and there’s a simple explanation for why — steel is cheap. The only drawback to steel is that it is weaker than some of the other options on this list.
  • Copper: Copper screws are good for fighting against corrosion. If a screw is going to be exposed to the elements, copper helps to ensure the screw performs durably over the long-term.
  • Aluminum: Aluminum isn’t as durable as other materials, but it does have one thing going for it — its weight. Aluminum is just about the lightest weight fastener you can find.
  • Titanium: When you need a blend of strength and lightness, go with titanium. You’ll often pay a premium for titanium screws, but that extra cost pays off big time when you need a fastener that is robust but doesn’t weigh much.

What About Coatings?

Screws are often coated to make them even better by giving them desirable qualities. Screw coatings open up a vast number of possibilities when you’re seeking the right fastener for a specific situation. For example, screws can be coated in copper, ceramic, zinc and other materials, which can provide extra strength, extra protection against corrosion or even an aesthetic quality that might otherwise be missing.

For example, a zinc-plated steel screw will better fight corrosion than a steel screw on its own. Likewise, a copper-plated screw may look more attractive in a prominent place than a steel screw would.

Which Screw Should I Use?

No two kinds of screws are alike. Before you buy screws for your next project, consider these points to make sure you are getting the right kind.

First, identify what materials you are screwing into. Different kinds of screws are made to fasten different materials. For example, the strongest wood screws are made for joining two pieces of wood. Once you’ve determined the material, measure its thickness. You’ll want to get a screw that is long enough to pass through the material and at least halfway into the next for a secure grip.

The next consideration is material. This decision will be based on where you plan to use the screw — indoors or outdoors. For an indoor project, you may be able to use a less expensive screw that looks pleasing if it will be visible. Outdoor projects need certain kinds of screws since they will be exposed to temperature changes and moisture. Then, consider the coating options to gain even more ideal qualities.

Find High-Quality Screws at All Points Fasteners

Now that you know everything you need to know about screws, it’s time to find the perfect screws for your next job. Are you ready to secure high-quality materials for your next job? Find them in our selection at All Points Fasteners.

We pride ourselves on offering a vast and varied selection of screws made of different materials that match particular specifications and feature various types of coatings. When you’re looking for something specific for a unique job at hand, we have the solution. If we happen to not have the screw you need, we’ll find it for you.

In addition to our wide selection, you’ll find competitive prices, fast shipping and outstanding customer service when you choose All Points Fasteners. We are dedicated to making sure you get exactly what you need as quickly as possible.

Browse our inventory of different screws today, and to learn more about our fasteners,  contact our team with any questions you have. Complete our contact form or call us at 800-483-6354.

 

Mastering the Ins & Outs of How to Use Tek Screws

How to Use Tek Screws

Tek screws are among the most popular screw types, and for a very good reason — they are a broad category that includes many different self-drilling screws. Tek screws are commonly used in the electrical industry and other service jobs where there’s a need to attach metal to metal or wood to wood. Tek screws are especially helpful when you are fastening in volume. Naturally, the self-drilling nature of Tek screws makes the work go much faster.

If you’re considering Tek screws for an upcoming job, here’s a look at what they are, how to use them, as well as the different types of Tek screws you can find.

What Are Tek Screws?

Tek screws are incredibly common due to their self-drilling or self-tapping nature. Whether you’re a service contractor or a do-it-yourself enthusiast, time is precious — and Tek screws help you save time.

Each Tek screw features a carving piece on its tip, which is what makes self-drilling possible. This means you don’t need to create a pilot hole before the fastener, and it also means your work moves forward efficiently.

Plus, Tek screws are versatile. While they are often used in the electrical industry, you can apply them to almost any project where a Tek screw’s self-drilling ability will be helpful.

The Ins and Outs of Using Tek Screws

The best way to use a Tek screw is with an electric screwdriver or drill. You can choose to create a pilot hole, which will ensure your Tek screw goes in straight. Just make sure your pilot hole is slightly smaller than the Tek screw, or else the screw’s grooves won’t be able to catch.

Many choose not to drill pilot holes, though, as one of the significant benefits of using Tek screws is that you don’t need to. Still, drive Tek screws as slowly as possible, which will help them drive straight even without a pilot hole. Tighten the screw, but make sure it’s not too tight. Tightening too much can lead to the head stripping, which will make it difficult to remove the Tek screw if necessary.

Different Types of Tek Screw

You’ll find a wide range of diverse types of Tek screws. Your application is unique, which is why you need to find a Tek screw that’s well-suited for the job. Some of your options will include:

  • Low-Profile Tek Screws: Low-profile Tek screws are perfect when you need to limit how far the screw’s head protrudes from its hole.
  • Hex Head Tek Screws: Hex heads always provide greater stability during installation. Find Tek screws with hex heads when you’re engaged in roofing and other applications that require self-drilling through aluminum or other metals.
  • Pan Head Tek Screws: Pan head Tek screws are perfect for light-duty applications, and they diminish the need to create a pilot hole.

This is just a sampling of the many types of Tek screws available on the market. Once you understand the job at hand, you’ll be able to identify the perfect Tek screw for completing the task effectively and efficiently.

Get the Tek Screws You Need at All Points Fasteners

Are you wondering: What is the use of a Tek screw? When using Tek screws, you enjoy speed, efficiency and stability that isn’t always available with other types of screws. Now that you know how to use Tek screws, it’s time to find the perfect products.

At All Points Fasteners, we carry a massive selection of fastening solutions — Tek screws included. When you choose All Points as your fastener supplier, you can always count on competitive pricing, high-quality products and industry-leading customer service and support.

Find the Tek screws you need for your next job today. Contact us if you have any questions.